Winter home sale profits

winter home sale
Reasons to buy (infographic from keepingcurrentmatters.com)

If you are planning to sell next spring, don’t wait!  Consider a winter home sale.  A National Association of Realtors survey indicates that a surge of home sale inventory is on the horizon.  The NAR third quarter Housing Opportunities and Market Experience survey indicated that 77 percent of Americans believe it to be a good time to sell (Homeowners Ready to Sell in the Third Quarter of 2018, says Realtor Survey; September 25, 2018; nar.realtor)!  This happens to be a record high for the survey.  NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun believes that the strong sentiment is due to recent home price appreciation.  He stated:

“Though the vast majority of consumers believe home prices will continue to increase or hold steady, they understand the days of easy, fast gains could be coming to an end. Therefore, more are indicating that it is a good time to sell, which is a healthy shift in the market.

A winter home sale has less seller competition

The housing market conditions are such that we are on the verge of experiencing a déjà vu.  Two years ago, winter home sales were fueled by rising mortgage interest rates, low inventory and pent up demand.  As I predicted in a November 2016 column, rising interest rates and pent up demand were credited for the almost 10 percent jump in home sales by the end of January 2017!  The massive jump in home sales occurred during the deep winter, when existing home sale inventory dropped about one-third of the summer inventory.  Sellers who had a winter home sale during 2016-17 were greeted by eager home buyers and faced little competition.

Fast forward to 2018.  Yes, admittedly, home sales have slightly dropped off during summer.  But many are attributing this phenomenon to the lack of inventory.  Consider that Montgomery County existing single-family home sale inventory was almost 20 percent lower than that of the summer of 2016.  Although summer home sales dropped off, indicators point to a hot winter housing market.  Moderating home prices, combined with pent up buyer demand and a strong economy could make a winter home sale ideal.

It’s clear that home buyers facing rising interest rates have taken a pause.  But as rates approach 5 percent, positive economic sentiment is lessening the shock and many are planning to buy before rates creep higher.  Giving perspective to the mortgage rate hysteria, current mortgage rates are about the same as they were during 2014.  Additionally, the last time we saw mortgage rates above 5 percent was in 2010.  Rates exceeded 6 percent when home sales broke records during the market buildup of 2006.

Current sentiment is good for a winter home sale

Another indicator that a winter home sale may be primed is the most recent Fannie Mae Home Purchase Sentiment Index (No Thanks to Housing, Home Purchase Sentiment Edges Up; fanniemae.com; August 2018).  Home buyer sentiment increased the first time since May.  Economists attribute this uptick to a strong economy along with the awareness of the recent market slowdown.  The job and income related index components increased significantly indicating that buyers feel financially more secure with a home purchase.  There is also a belief that home prices may moderate due to the summer sales slump.

Winter home sales tend to have less competition and serious home buyers.  As I said in 2016, don’t wait until spring to sell your home!  If you wait until spring to list your home, you’ll be faced with a profusion of seller competition.

Original located at https://dankrell.com/blog/2018/10/03/winter-home-sale-profits/

Copyright© Dan Krell
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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Rent vs Buy puzzle

rent vs buy
The Rent vs Buy decision is a personal puzzle (infographic from keepingcurrentmatters.com)

For some, committing to buying a home is an easy decision.  However, some struggle rationalizing homeownership.  Adding to the confusion are the attempts to persuade tenants to be home owners by flaunting its benefits and financial savvy.  To be sure, there are personal and financial factors that go into deciding Rent vs Buy.  However, the reality is that the Rent vs Buy question is a complicated personal puzzle.

Are you weighing the decision of Rent vs Buy?  Consider that homeownership does have benefits over renting.  Besides having a place to live, the consensus is that homeownership provides stability and belonging to a community.   Numerous studies have associated being a home owner with increased well being and better health outcomes.  Research by the Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies concluded that homeownership and growing wealth are associated (Herbert, McCue, and Sanchez-Moyano; Is Homeownership Still an Effective Means of Building Wealth for Low-income and Minority Households? Was it Ever? Joint Center for Housing Studies Harvard University, September 2013).

But frustrated home buyers are returning to their rentals because of inventory shortages, intense competition, and increased home prices can be aggravating.

The latest National Association of Realtors (nar.realtor) press release indicted a 1.5 percent decrease in home sales from the previous year.  Although home sales were weak for the previous four months, home prices have increased for the 70th consecutive month!  Nationwide median existing home prices increased 4.6 percent from the previous year to $264,800.  The lack of home sale inventory is partly to blame for the decreased home sales, which increases the upward pressure on home prices.

The Greater Capital Association of Realtors (gcaar.com) release of August housing data for Montgomery County is not much different from the national figures.  Single-family home sales in the county decreased 0.7 percent from the previous year.  Inventory is 8.3 percent below last year’s available homes for sale at the end of August.  But median home sale prices jumped to $443,000, which is an increase of 4.2 percent.

Those who are dissuaded from buying a home because of increasing home prices are facing rent increases.  The median rent for Montgomery County is $1,647.  But according to Healthy Montgomery (healthymontgomery.org), there is upward pressure on rent.  This is not just a local phenomenon, it is nationwide.  According to the Census Bureau (census.gov), some metropolitan areas and cities have experienced increases well over $300.  Rent increases are in part due to inflation and the increasing cost of owning a rental property.  However, tenants are mainly experiencing rent increases because of supply and demand.  Rental inventory is just as tight as home sale inventory.  The Census Bureau reported that the vacancy rate decreased year over year.  Additionally, the Census Bureau reported last year that the percentage of renters who moved during 2017 was the lowest recorded since 1988.

The robust economy has prompted the Fed to increase interest rates this year.  Another rate hike is expected this week.  According to Freddie Mac (freddiemac.com), mortgage rates have increased in anticipation of the Fed’s rate hike.  According to Freddie Mac’s Mortgage Market Survey, the average 30-year fixed rate mortgage is 4.65 percent.  Although mortgage rates are the highest in several years, rates continue to be historically low.

For many who continue to rent, they’re perspective may be justified by comparing housing costs.  The Trulia Rent vs Buy Calculator (trulia.com/rent_vs_buy) is a tool that compares these factors.  Paying rent for a long term may make sense if your rent is low.  However, buying can be a better long-term decision when comparing similar size properties and housing costs.

Consulting with  Realtor can help too. You can find out which is feasible Rent vs Buy. You can see if there are any homes for sale in your affordability range. You can also find out what rentals are available in your rent range.  Regardless of your Rent vs Buy decision, your real estate agent can assist you with housing and the process for home buying or renting.

Original located at https://dankrell.com/blog/2018/09/27/rent-vs-buy-puzzle

Copyright© Dan Krell
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The copious home sale contract

home sale contract
Home buying process (infographic from floridarealtors.org)

If you’ve recently bought or sold a home in Montgomery County MD, you probably recognized that the home sale contract was quite lengthy.  In fact, depending on the situation and additional addenda, a contract can be fifty-plus pages. It seems as if that the home sale contract gets fatter as every year passes. It’s no wonder why I am often asked “Why are home sale contracts long winded?”

Why is our home sale contract so long?  Our local home sale contract has a number of required addenda and disclosures.  There is a simple reason for this, but let’s look at the foundation and need for the contract.

It’s important to mention that property sale contracts around the country are not the same.  Every jurisdiction has their own criteria for a home sale contract.  A recent client who relocated from New Jersey shared their home sale contract, which was a fraction of the size of our local contract.  Likewise, a colleague asserted the same about the property contracts in Arizona, where he was licensed for a number of years.

Property sale contracts go back into antiquity.  Most likely, ancient contracts formed a basis of ancient record keeping.  These ancient contracts were also “promises” that were enforced in some manner that was keeping with the time.  For example, The History Blog (thehistoryblog.com) tells the account of the Mogao Caves which are located in the Gobi Desert and date back to the fourth century.  One of the caves held a cache of financial documents from medieval China, including property sale contracts and records!

According to the legal historian A. W. B. Simpson, modern English contract law has roots in the middle ages (A History of the Common Law of Contract: The Rise of the Action of Assumpsit; Clarendon Press; 1987).  The contract was founded in the concept of “assumpsit,” which was the basis for resolving “broken promises.”  Assumpsit allowed individuals to bring claims of broken promises to local courts.  Although the practice was traced back to the thirteenth century, court hearings were routine in the sixteenth century.  This model became the basis for enforcing a private contract.

It wasn’t until 1677 when the English Parliament enacted “An Act for the Prevention of Frauds and Perjuries,” known today as the Statute of Frauds.  According to Russell Decker, the Parliament enacted the law that required contracts to be written, because parties obliged by a contract were not allowed to provide testimony in court (The Repeal of the Statute of Frauds in England; American Business Law Journal; 1973; 11:1 p55).  The written contract was the “witness” to a promise.  However, most of the Statute of Frauds was mostly repealed in England in 1954.

The Statute of Frauds is still alive and well in the US and the basis for the real estate contract in Maryland.  Statute of Frauds is a subtitle of the Real Property Act of the Code of Maryland.  Section 5-104 Executory Contracts states: “No action may be brought on any contract for the sale or disposition of land or of any interest in or concerning land unless the contract on which the action is brought, or some memorandum or note of it, is in writing and signed by the party to be charged or some other person lawfully authorized by him.”

So ok, home sale contracts need to be in writing, but why are our contracts lengthy?  The reason is because many of the addenda and disclosures are generated because of statutory requirements to provide specific information in a contract of sale. Besides  the expected list of notices and disclosures (such as property condition), there is a compendium of additional required notices and disclosures that is found in Code of Maryland  Miscellaneous subtitle of the Real Property Act section 14-117 Contracts for Sale of Property.  Additionally, jurisdictions around the state include additional addenda and notices for home sales within the respective county and/or locality.  Of course, Montgomery County has added a number of disclosures and notices (such as the Utility Cost and Usage History Form and the Real Property Estimated Tax).

Make sure your agent is knowledgeable about the jurisdiction in which you are buying or selling.  As a buyer, you need to make sure you receive all the relevant notices and disclosures.  As a seller, you may incur a fine for non-disclosure of certain notices.

Original located at https://dankrell.com/blog/2018/09/20/copious-home-sale-contract/

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Flood insurance checkup

flood insurance
National Flood Insurance Program (fema.gov)

Hurricane Florence is not your average storm.  As it will undoubtedly devastate the area where it makes landfall, it will also wreak havoc along the east coast.  Some are already calling it a historic storm.  Flooding is expected not just along the coast, but also well into the mainland due to heavy rains.  Even my local county (Montgomery County) is bracing for persistent heavy rain even though we are in central MD. In its aftermath, hurricane Florence will be another reminder for Congress to act on a long-term reform of the National Flood Insurance Program.

The National Flood Insurance Program was created 1968 as a result of the aftermath of hurricane Betsy.    After the 1965 hurricane ravaged the gulf coast, Congress realized that flood insurance should be affordable and widely available to home owners, tenants, and businesses.  The National Flood Insurance Program provides coverage associated with hurricanes, tropical storms, and heavy rains.  Like other Federal programs, Congress funds the program.  However, in recent years, Congress has appropriated short term extensions for the program.  The current extension provides funding through November.

National Association of Realtors President Elizabeth Mendenhall, issued a statement regarding the impending storm and a plea to Congress to act on reforming the National Flood Insurance Plan.  Mendenhall stated in the September 11th press release that there are an estimated 750,000 homes at risk from a coastal storm surge.  Furthermore, there is the potential of an estimated $170 billion of property damage just in the Carolinas and Virginia (nar.realtor).

Representing the National Association of Realtors, Mendenhall urges Congress to pass a long-term National Flood Insurance Plan by pointing out that “Flooding is the most common disaster in the United States, one that affects Americans in communities both coastal and inland every year.” She is correct to say, “In these times, we are reminded of the importance of peace of mind for property owners with access to quality and affordable flood insurance.

FEMA’s Flood Smart (floodsmart.gov) portal is where you can find more information about flood insurance and protecting your home before and after a flood.  Before a storm like Florence, you can reduce your risk by preparing.  FEMA offers suggestions for flood prepping, which includes (but not limited to): elevating critical utilities; ensuring your sump pump is working and has a battery back-up; install a water alarm in your basement; clear debris from gutters and down spouts; store irreplaceable documents (such as birth certificates, passports, etc.) in a safe, dry place; and of course, build an emergency supply kit that is ready to go when you are.  Your emergency kit should minimally include non-perishable food, bottled water, first aid, medicines and a battery-operated radio.  Ready.gov has checklists and additional preparedness information, including building your emergency supply kit.

It’s also recommended to make an inventory of your valuables so as to make filing insurance claims easier.  Additionally, know your flood risk level by checking FEMA’s interactive flood map (msc.fema.gov/portal/search).

FEMA warns home owners that regardless of your risk zone, flood insurance may be a necessary add-on to your homeowners’ insurance policy.  Even if you live in low or moderate flood risk area, you are five times more likely to experience a flood in your home than a fire.  Don’t assume your homeowners’ insurance policy covers flood damage.  Even if you have a flood rider, your coverage may be limited.  Review your policy with your insurance agent to determine if you have flood coverage as well as its limitations.

Original published at https://dankrell.com/blog/2018/09/12/flood-insurance-checkup/

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Protected by Copyscape Web Plagiarism DetectorDisclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

National Preparedness Month

National Preparedness Month
National Preparedness Month (from Ready.Gov)

September is National Preparedness Month!  Being prepared is not just having a “bugout” bag at the ready.  Preparedness is about taking stock to ensure safety for yourself and family in various conditions.  When you hear “preparedness,” you may automatically think of disaster or national emergency.  But it’s also about coping with various local emergencies including: weather, active shooter, hazardous materials, chemical, cybersecurity, and power outages.

FEMA encourages Americans to be prepared to prepare for and respond to all types of emergencies, including natural disasters and potential terrorist attacks.  National Preparedness Month is FEMA’s focused outreach effort to educate and empower everyone through local and online events (https://www.ready.gov/september).  National Preparedness Month activities are occurring throughout the country.  In Montgomery County MD, local National Preparedness Month activities are coordinated through the County’s Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security.

Preparedness in your home starts with maintenance.  Proper home maintenance can not only help mitigate a disaster, but also prevent one as well.  Regular maintenance of the home’s systems is obviously suggested.  However, there are specific emergency related recommendations to help you in your home, which include: testing smoke alarms monthly, replacing smoke alarms every ten years, and knowing how to shut off your home’s utilities.  Additionally, to prevent a chimney fire, you should have your fireplace and chimney inspected and cleaned annually by a qualified and reputable professional.

Information is key to getting through an emergency.  If you have a cell phone, you may receive “Wireless Emergency Alerts” through the Integrated Public Alert Warning System, which includes amber alerts, weather alerts, and notifications from the Emergency Alert System.  However, localities also have there own alert systems.  Here in Montgomery County MD, the Montgomery Alert system can inform you of local government and school information, weather alerts, as well as traffic and infrastructure issues (montgomerycountymd.gov/OEMHS/AlertMontgomery).

National Preparedness Month
FEMA Preparedness Checklist (from ready.gov)

Do you have an emergency plan?  You should have a plan in case an emergency occurs in and out of the home.  Take time to update your home fire evacuation plan, and practice it with a family fire drill.  Choose a family rendezvous point in case an emergency occurs during work/school hours and the home is inaccessible.  Because cell phones are not reliable during emergencies, alternate means of communication should be considered.  Create a family communication plan by including: family contact information, family physician, medical facility information, and an out-of-town point of contact.

Is your homeowner’s insurance adequate?  The aftermath of recent hurricanes and floods have demonstrated that home owners with proper insurance coverage recover from those disasters quicker.  Insurance and emergency experts recommend to regularly review your insurance policy with your agent to ensure that the replacement costs of your home and possessions are covered.  Coverage varies depending on the policy.  Experts recommended to discuss flood and disaster insurance with your insurance agent.

As for the “bugout” bag… It’s recommended that you have an emergency kit in the home and in your car.  A basic kit should be able to get you and your family through 72 hours of an emergency.  However, extreme emergencies have revealed that infrastructure can be disrupted for weeks.  Many experts encourage having an expanded home emergency kit to last at least two weeks in case of a prolonged lack of infrastructure.

Learn more about National Preparedness Month at FEMA’s Ready.gov (ready.gov/September).  Ready.gov provides detailed information about preparedness for yourself, your family and your home, including assembling an emergency kit.  Local preparedness information in Montgomery County MD can be obtained from Montgomery County’s Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security (montgomerycountymd.gov/oemhs).

Original located at https://dankrell.com/blog/2018/09/05/national-preparedness-month/

Copyright© Dan Krell
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