Real estate futurism

real estate futurism
Real estate futurism (infographic from nar.realtor).

Humans are fascinated with the future and technology.  Whether it’s the promise of hope and deliverance, or the warning of a dystopian nightmare, there will always be a continued conjecture of the future.  And it’s no different with real estate.  Real estate experts also like to dream about the future and technology, and depict real estate futurism

Housingwire is one the foremost authorities on anything real estate and housing.  It also is a leader in reporting about real estate technology too. This year’s reporting of Housingwire’s Tech100 Awards caught my attention.  But it wasn’t about some shiny new technology that is touted to be “the next big thing.”  Instead, it was the real estate futurism prediction and where real estate technology is headed (Expert: Here’s where real estate tech will be in five years, And will AI replace humans?; housingwire.com December 21, 2018).

Although the article was only one expert’s opinion of real estate futurism, it’s telling nonetheless.  The expert sees that tech assisted appointments and automatic doors are technological advancements.  Additionally, home buyers will be using virtual reality to view homes.  He sees that consumer searches are geo-located. Big data will know what they want based on their online behavior, and so on.  If his list of the industry’s future tech sounds as if it came from the early 2000’s, you’re not alone.  If you think about it, much of this five-year tech advancement prediction has already been around in one form or another.

This expert’s vision of real estate tech in the not-so-distant future is basically more of the same.  It makes you wonder if the real estate industry is focused on using shiny things to get people’s attention (but really doesn’t do much to make the transaction easier and safer).  This interview also signifies that real estate futurism is relegated to existing tech. In other words, real estate technology is not exclusive unto itself, but is only the application of existing technology. 

Predicting the future is difficult and requires the ability to depict a new paradigm.  Spyros Makridakis, an expert in understanding future technology, writes that tech advancement depends on four things; (1) the benefits of the technology, (2) funding to create/implement the technology; (3) growth in funding the technology; and (4) the urgency to solve a problem (Forecasting the Impact of Artificial Intelligence, Part 5:The Emerging and Long-Term Future; The International Journal of Applied Forecasting; 2018; issue 51 p36-41).  Makridakis’ vision of future technology will not be about shiny things that make you go “ohh,” but instead how you interface with technology.

Makridakis’ prediction for the future is that you won’t be using computer screens like you do today. Instead, you will have a type of wrist device that projects holographic images that will “blend virtual and augmented” reality.  These devices will be like your smartphone but allow holographic communications.  Additionally, brain-computer interfaces will allow you “unlimited access to computer power.”  He believes that this paradigm shift will affect how you work and interact socially.  He also believes that robots will become personal assistants and be assigned the boring and uninteresting work.

Real estate futurism based on Makridakis’ futuristic thinking could mean a slightly different home buying and selling process.  Your augmented brain-computer interface will allow you to process information about a home significantly faster, as well as digitally sign AI prepared contracts and closing documents. And instead of scrolling through pictures or wearing a virtual reality mask, you will be walking through holograms of homes right in our living rooms projected from your wrist.

Original located at https://dankrell.com/blog/2018/12/29/real-estate-futurism

By Dan Krell. Copyright © 2018.

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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Real Estate Thanksgiving

real estate thanksgiving
A Real Estate Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is a time to take stock and be thankful.  Although the original Thanksgiving may have had a religious purpose, today’s secular holiday is about traditions.  However, it seems as if the tradition of enjoying a peaceful meal with family and friends has been increasingly difficult over the past few years.  But since the election is over, let’s try to talk about something worthy of discussion (at least until the next election cycle begins), such as real estate and housing. Yes, it’s a “Real Estate Thanksgiving.”

Why shouldn’t we focus on something we all can get behind? There is a good chance that your dinner guests will include someone will be moving next year.  Whether they are buying, selling, or renting a home, someone at the dinner table will be affected by such issues as housing affordability, mortgage rates, and availability of homes.

Things to talk about during your Real Estate Thanksgiving might be about mortgages, home sales, home prices, rent, maintenance, etc.  The topics are seemingly endless.

Talking about mortgages during the Real Estate Thanksgiving.  The current news is about mortgage interest rates.  How high will mortgage rates go?  Housing experts agree that mortgage rates will likely be about 5 percent next year (although the Fed just announced they may hold off on interest rate hikes after spring).  Paying more interest on your mortgage may not be your idea of positively affecting home sales.  However, increasing mortgage rates typically moderate home price growth because of affordability.  Another silver lining of increasing interest rates is a stimulated lending environment.  As a result, mortgage companies will likely further loosen lending requirements, which will increase the home buyer pool.

Real Estate Thanksgiving and home sales could focus on the reasons for the fall slowdown.  Will home sales rebound this spring?  You’re probably aware that home sales have dropped off during the fall.  Major media outlets have grasped the news and created the meme depicting “housing bubble 2.0.”  You can’t really blame them because there are many economists who are projecting bleak home sales to continue through spring.

The main reason for a disappointing 2019 forecast given by many industry insiders is affordability.  I contend that this rationale is shallow and one-dimensional.  There is no doubt that rising interest rates and increasing home prices are on the minds of home buyers.  However, the lack of home sale inventory is a dimension that is often forgotten when discussing home sales and rentals.  The lack of available homes for buyers and tenants to choose has forced many into fierce competition.  The result has been upward pressure on home prices and rents.

You have to also consider the economy at your Real Estate Thanksgiving. The strength of the economy is an aspect affecting the housing market that many haven’t discussed.  Whether you want to admit it or not, the economy is the strongest it has been in decades.  Consumer outlook is optimistic.  Home buyers and renters have expressed confidence about their job prospects too.  Employers are competing for talent, influencing the highest wage increases in over a decade.

Commenting on the economy, First American chief economist Mark Fleming believes that the economy will be a major force in the housing market (How Will a Potential September Rate Hike Impact Existing-Home Sales?; blog.firstam.com; September 18, 2018).  One of the features of his analysis for 2019 is “It’s the Economy and First-Time Home Buyer Demand, Stupid.”  He described a pent-up demand from a wave of millennial of first-time home buyers who will be in the market next year.

Fleming explained that home sales slump during an adjustment period that home buyers undergo when interest rates increase.  The same thing occurred in 2010 when rates increased from 4.5 to 5 percent.  However, the economy was struggling at that time, and home sales were stagnant.  Fleming described First American’s positive housing forecasts overcoming rising interest rates, saying,

“According to our Potential Home Sales Model, the boost from the strong economy and first-time home buyer demand should overcome any downward pressure from rising rates on home sales.”

Original article is published at https://dankrell.com/blog/2018/11/21/real-estate-thanksgiving/

By Dan Krell. Copyright © 2018.

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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Buyer and seller attitudes about real estate market

Economists are officially pessimistic about the housing market.  This is the general sentiment following another month of declining home sales.  Experts are pointing to a number of factors for the slowdown, including increased interest rates and housing affordability.  But what are home buyer and seller attitudes about real estate? The National Association of Realtors’ most recent Housing Opportunities and Market Experience survey hints at a busy spring!

Economic attitudes about real estate market

attitudes about real estate
Attitudes about real estate market (infographic from nar.realtor)

An October 19th NAR news release (nar.realtor) reported that September’s home sales were the weakest in several years.  The nationwide trend affected all regions.  NAR chief economist Lawrence Yun stated:

This is the lowest existing home sales level since November 2015…A decade’s high mortgage rates are preventing consumers from making quick decisions on home purchases. All the while, affordable home listings remain low, continuing to spur underperforming sales activity across the country.”

First-time-home-buyers are finding the housing market increasingly challenging.  This segment’s participation needs to be strong for a healthy home sales.  September’s low thirty-two percent first-time-home-buyer participation is attributed to rising interest rates and home prices.

But low housing inventory is also an issue.  September’s housing inventory decreased to 1.88 million existing homes available for sale (from the 1.91 available during the previous month).  NAR President Elizabeth Mendenhall stated:

“Despite small month over month increases, the share of first-time buyers in the market continues to underwhelm because there are simply not enough listings in their price range.”

Economists at Fannie Mae believe that the housing market will continue to disappoint.  In an October 18th press release (fanniemae.com) Fannie Mae Chief Economist Doug Duncan stated:

“Our expectations for housing have become more pessimistic. Rising interest rates and declining housing sentiment from both consumers and lenders led us to lower our home sales forecast over the duration of 2018 and through 2019. Meanwhile, affordability, especially for first-time homebuyers, remains atop the list of challenges facing the housing market.”

But what do economists really know about the future?  Let’s hear it directly from the consumer!

Home buyer and seller attitudes about real estate

NAR’s Housing Opportunities and Market Experience survey tracks opinions from renters and homeowners about homeownership, economy, and the housing market.  The release of their third quarter 2018 survey indicates that sixty-three percent of respondents strongly or moderately believe that it’s a good time to buy a home.  Although optimism is somewhat diminished from the second quarter’s survey, there continues to be a positive sentiment about buying a home.  The survey’s positive sentiment continues even though a majority of respondents believed that home prices will continue to increase in the immediate six months.  Additionally, a majority of respondents believe that qualifying for a mortgage may be an obstacle to a home purchase.

The survey also concurs with other metrics indicating high consumer sentiment for the economy.  In light of the recent slide in home sales, NAR’s recent Housing Opportunities and Market Experience survey reveals a near-record high of sixty percent of households believe that the economy is improving.”  Adding to the strong sentiment is the survey’s increased monthly Personal Financial Outlook Index, which indicates that respondents believe that their financial situation will be better in six months.

The survey also indicates a record high of home sellers who believe it is a good time to sell a home.  But given the seasonal decline of housing inventory, it is likely this will translate to a surge of home listings in the spring.  The added inventory combined with high consumer sentiment will boost the housing market. So sayeth the consumer.

By Dan Krell    
Copyright © 2018.

Original located at https://dankrell.com/blog/2018/11/01/attitudes-real-estate-market/

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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Real estate tin men

real estate tin men
Beware the real estate tin men (infographic from keepingcurrentmatters.com)

Beware the Real Estate Tin Men!  “Tin men” was a term used to describe con-artists after the 1987 Barrie Levinson movie by the same name became a nationwide hit.  The movie was about aluminum siding salesmen who did whatever they could to sell home improvements in 1963 Baltimore.  The story revealed how everyday “schnooks” created the façade of a successful sales person, as well as revealing their unscrupulous sales tactics.  The main characters are flawed and likable, so much so that you’re rooting for them as they are cross-examined at their MHIC license hearing.

Modern versions of tin men still exist.  They exist in all professions.  They are constantly refining their tactics to get your business. They will often tell you what you want to hear.

When it comes to buying and selling a home, beware of the real estate tin men!  These are agents who will say and do almost anything for your business.

Many real estate agents still use tin men tactics.  Real estate sales is difficult and many agents will do whatever they can to get a leg up on their competition and a chance at a sales commission.  There is a subculture in the industry that is focused on pushing the ethical envelope to make money.  This philosophy is spread by “gurus” and coaches who teach sales tactics, persuasion, and income strategies.

Unlike the world of 1963, when a salesman could easily lie to make the sale, today’s easy flow of information makes it unlikely that a real estate agent would flat-out lie.  The internet has created a savvy and knowledgeable consumer by allowing easy authentication of information.  However, the internet has not changed the real estate agent’s reputation for bending the truth, otherwise known as “puffery.”

Rapport is often built on appearances.  Like the 1960’s tin men, many real estate agents also employ smoke and mirrors to help them appear successful.  Although some still drive cars and dress beyond their means to “fake it,” many agents rely on technology for their trickery.  The art of deception is widely used by agents who dare to manipulate data.  Many real estate agents, who supervise other agents, take credit for MLS sales they had nothing to do with so as to appear they have many more sales (than they actually do).  Likewise, many agents pay for fake internet reviews.  Although many platforms screen for false reviews, agents continue to find ways to get fake 5-star reviews on websites, including incentivizing unsolicited otherwise 5-star reviews from clients.

Many real estate agents rely on gimmicks as a means of getting business.  A popular agent promotion is “I will buy your home if it doesn’t sell.”  The reality is that although the agent may offer to buy your home if they can’t sell it, the conditions actually don’t make it a viable option.  Another oversold gimmick is “cutting-edge” marketing.  The promise of cutting-edge marketing used to mean advanced and new.  However, today cutting-edge real estate marketing is overshadowed by the truth that homes are primarily viewed on real estate internet portals, such as Zillow (all MLS listings are posted to these portals).

Most Realtors are ethical and do the right thing.  A recent article by Jim Dalrymple II even touts broker (and agent) humility as the “new method” and business model (Humility, not arrogance, is the new real estate leadership trend; inman.com; October 17, 2017).  And although real estate agents have increasingly been leaning towards transparency and authenticity, you should still beware of tin men.

Original located at https://dankrell.com/blog/2018/10/25/real-estate-tin-men/

By Dan Krell.          Copyright © 2018.

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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Real estate services personality

The “one-size-fits-all” service model is becoming an all too familiar experience in every day life.  You encounter it when you go to the doctor’s office.  A day at the mall is certainly a one-size-fits-all adventure.  Now, there is also the pressure towards automated buying and selling systems in the real estate industry.  Real estate services that is one-size-fits-all?  The idea of a one-size-fits-all real estate transaction is becoming trendy from both online companies and local real estate companies.

How do real estate services treat clients?

real estate services
Real Estate Services (infographic from nar.realtor(

The move toward systematizing consumer encounters comes from the corporate goal of profiting from efficiency.  Don’t get me wrong, there is nothing wrong from a business making money.  After all, making money is the basis of our economy.  And the one-size-fits-all system for home buying and selling is a business solution during a healthy housing market where homes sell quickly.

However, the systematization of the service industry, including real estate, is not welcome by all consumers.  There is some acknowledgement that a systematized real estate transaction can have unfortunate outcomes when the plan is derailed.  Not all real estate transactions are easy, nor do all homes sell quickly.  It is a fact that that most home buyers and sellers still want an expert they can count on to help them navigate one of the most expensive and stressful transactions of their life.

Customer service research

Gauging the effects of a systematized service industry on the consumer is a growing interest.  One recent study examined customer service reactions when the provider system fails (Diaz, Gomez, Martin-Consuegra, Molina; The Effects of Perceived Satisfaction with Service Recovery Efforts: A Study in a Hotel Setting; Ekonomie a Management; 2017, 20:4 p.203-18).  The study suggested that customer issues are inevitable.  They conclude that customer service models should have strategies to address and resolve issues to maintain positive customer relationships.

Another study suggested that when it comes to automated service, some service industries are better suited than others (Scherer & Von Wangenheim;  Man Versus Machine-How the Service Channel Affects Customers’ Responses to Service Encounters; AMA Winter Educators’ Conference Proceedings; 2016, Vol. 27).  The authors suggest that a consumer’s expectation is guided by how a service is provided.  Satisfaction levels are increased when personal services are delivered by a human.  Furthermore, they found that consumers who prefer technology or automated services tend to be ego-centric.  These “self-service” consumers attribute success to their abilities, while shifting blame to externals when there is a failure.

Real estate services for all personalities

The growing body of research may explain why real estate agents have not become extinct in a technological world.  Instead, the profession has endured.  Moreover, Realtors have embraced technology (for better or worse).  As new technologies make the home buying and selling process easier, the industry will undoubtedly adapt.  The fad of systematizing the real estate transaction, as well as buyer and seller encounters, is in reality a “one-size-fits-some” solution.  In other words, there is a place for the automated and systematic real estate transaction, but it’s not for everyone.

Before you embark on your home buying or selling journey, you should think about your needs.  What are your expectations?

As a real estate consumer, you have a duty to explore your options for real estate services.  You should interview and compare real estate services. Questions to ask your real estate agent before you buy or sell a home:

  • Is there one point of contact, or do you have to deal with a “team” of people for different situations.
  • What do you do if the point of contact is not available?
  • How do they handle unexpected obstacles or emergencies?
  • Ask for recent client references whom you can call.

By Dan Krell    
Copyright © 2018.

Original is located at https://dankrell.com/blog/2018/10/19/real-estate-services-personality/

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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.