Don’t buy into a false economy

by Dan Krell
DanKrell.com
© 2012
Google+

Auction Stories about housing and real estate often reported in local media are entertaining and sometimes informative. However, some stories can create an erroneous impression about what’s happening in the marketplace. If you are not careful, you may be lead to buy into a false economy; using a Realtor® in today’s market is vital to get real time neighborhood information to make the best decisions.

A recent story highlighted a DC foreclosure that reportedly received over one hundred offers, and the accepted offer was more than double the list price. The story appeared to use this home sale as an example of a hot DC market. And make no mistake – that neighborhood is a hot market for various reasons (including the limited number of active homes for sale); but there’s missing information that could distort your perspective.

First, understand that the story referred to the sale of a HUD owned property, which was most likely a FHA foreclosure. The fact that there were reportedly 168 offers on the property is not unusual for a HUD owned property located in a neighborhood with very active buyers; although some HUD properties don’t get much attention, it is not unusual for many such homes to attract a lot of attention, as well as many offers.

Most offers on HUD homes are usually at list price or below, not only because savvy buyers are seeking a foreclosure bargain; but because of financing limitations. HUD appraises these properties so as to know the market value, and usually lists the home at that price. HUD foreclosures that are eligible for FHA financing use that appraisal, and are therefore limited to that price.

The MLS listing for this home indicated that it was listed “Insured with Escrow,” which means that the home was eligible for FHA financing. And looking at recent neighborhood comps, it looks as if the home was priced competitively. Additionally, the repair escrow indicates that the home requires repairs to meet FHA guidelines.

AuctionAlthough there are some buyers who pay over list price for an “Insured” HUD foreclosure, they know they need to pay cash or find alternate financing; so unless the buyer of this home has cash, the buyer could encounter issues obtaining alternate financing. Furthermore, although the story reported that the home sold, the MLS listing indicates that the home is under contract with contingencies (home inspection). So, the home is far from settled, and it remains to be seen if this contract falls through (or remains owner-occupied as required for this sale).

Although the story about this home sale was interesting, it is not typical for the housing market. The story does not indicate that the reported 14% DC median home sale price increase compares November 2012 sales to November 2011. There is also no mention that “luxury” home sales could have impacted November’s home sale price figures; GCAAR (gcaar.com) reported that DC single family home sales priced at $1.5M and above increased about 111%! Also, according Realestate Business Intelligence (rbintel.com), the November 2012 average DC sale price is about 97% of list; the average sale price is not over list.

Don’t get me wrong, this was a good story. But the story may be about buying into a false economy and buyer’s remorse; the real story may ultimately be how you should consult with your Realtor® before making a purchase or sale.

More news and articles on “the Blog”
Protected by Copyscape Web Plagiarism Detector
This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. This article was originally published in the Montgomery County Sentinel the week of December 24, 2012. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws. Copyright © 2012 Dan Krell.

This entry was posted in buyer's remorse, foreclosure, foreclosure listings, housing market, HUD, market conditions, real estate and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.