Housing market 2006

In reading some of the real estate forecasts for 2006, I was reminded of H. G. Wells’ novel, “The Shape of Things to Come.” What does H. G. Wells have to do with Real Estate? Nothing. Well almost nothing. Any self respecting science fiction enthusiast knows that the 1933 novel about the future of mankind was eerily prophetic about the outbreak of the Second World War as well as some technological advances. However, the novel was pure science fiction. The housing market 2006 is another matter

So I had to ask myself, “what is it about economic forecasts, real estate market predictions specifically, that seem to be prophetic in one regard and erroneous in other details?” I believe that in order to get a balanced perspective you have to get information from various sources and pull the pertinent plausible statements to form the picture. The same holds true to the coming year in the local real estate market.

So what can we expect from the housing market 2006 ?

The National Association of Realtors predicts 2006 to be the second best year in history for sales activity (Realtor.org). David Lereah, chief economist for the NAR, stated in a NAR press release on December 12 that he feels that economic conditions will be positive for the housing market in the coming year. He states that general economic conditions will be good to help sustain a stable real estate market.

Conversely, the UCLA Anderson Forecast (UCLAForecast.com), the folks who accurately predicted the recession in 2001, predicted in a recent press release that there will be a “weakness” in the national economy due to problems in the housing sector. Their vision is a weaker economy through 2007 because of a slower housing market and loss of construction and housing related jobs. The bottom line is that they believe that there is a rough road the next few years, but there will be no recession.

Interestingly enough you might think that Realtors who are active in the local market would have cohesive and consistent outlook on the future. That is not the case. Local Realtors who are quoted in Realty Times (realtytimes.com) share differing opinions about the state of the present market and offer differing views about the near future.

So, what can we make of all this confusing information? Well, with regard to mortgage interest rates, the Fed is expected to have at least one more increase planed, so it will remain to be seen where mortgage interest rates level off. Currently, mortgage rates are higher than they have been in recent history, but still hover at a respectable 6.25%. Additionally, home sales have dropped off from last year’s pace but prices are still increasing. So economically, it seems as if there is a sense of return to equilibrium.

What people have described as a bubble bust, or a downturn in the real estate market, is actually a return to a more balanced market. The dysfunctional expectation that a home should sell for $25,000 (or more) than the last home sold, and have many home buyers place an offer on one home in a moments notice will change to the more reasonable expectation of selling at market value and having a buyer contract on a home in several (or more) weeks.

Real estate market report 2005

Many experts are not only talking about the real estate bubble, but how it’s about to burst. I was interested in finding out how many articles and proclamations exist about the bursting bubble, so I googled “housing bubble Washington, DC.” There were over 800,000 links to people and articles (some going back to 2002), talking about how the bubble is about to burst. Many talk about concerns of financial impact and others talk about a doomsday scenario when the bubble bursts. Here’s the real estate market report 2005.

Real estate market report 2005

If you look at the mid year statistics, it seems that the Washington D.C. real estate market is still in full swing. You can decide for yourself based on the statistics for single family homes in Montgomery County. So, here is the mid-year report card, based on the statistics compiled by the Greater Capital Area Association of Realtors (GCAAR). Homes listed for sale for June 2005 totaled 2,004, up from the 1,971 homes listed in June 2004, an increase of 1.7 percent. The fact that more homes are coming on the market sounds encouraging, however, the total active listings in June 2005 (homes listed for sale but not under contract) are down 4.5percent from the same time last year. So, although the supply of homes being listed for sale rose, the actual amount of homes available on the market has reduced because there are home buyers ready to gobble these homes up as they come onto market.

It seems as if the home buyers’ appetites for homes are insatiable so far this year. The number of contracts and settlements are up for the period of January to June 2005 as compared to the same time period in 2004. The number of houses where status changed from active to contract during the first six months of 2005 increased 1.3percent compared the first six months of 2004. Additionally, the number of homes that were settled during the first six months of 2005 increased 2.5percent compared to the same six month period in 2004.

Interestingly, I would like to note the sales of homes that sold for $1,000,000 or more increased from last year. There were 389 of these million dollar plus homes that sold in the first six moths of 2005, compared to the 265 sold in the same time period in 2004, that is a 46percent increase! So far, for 2005, the average sale price in Montgomery is $544,719. Compared to $477,937 for the same time period in 2004, it is an increase of $66,782! (stats from gcaar.com).

Will there be a correction or a full blown crises?

Looking at the statistics above, you may ask yourself, “can prices continue to climb and record numbers of sales continue year after year?” The market can’t continue double digit appreciation forever.  Will there be a correction or a full blown crises? Whatever happens, there will always be a real estate market.

by Dan Krell © 2005