Evolving real estate scams – vigilance needed

from Realtor.org

Last year, an old wire transfer scam evolved to target Realtors® and their clients. A December 15th “Alert” put out by the National Association of Realtors® (realtor.org) reminded NAR members and consumers to be vigilant. “The hackers often send an email that appears to be from an individual legitimately involved in the transaction, informing the recipient, often the buyer, that there has been a last minute change to the wiring instructions.  Following the new instructions, the recipient will wire funds directly to the hacker’s account, which will be cleared out in a matter of minutes. The money is almost always lost forever.”

real estate

From Realtor.org

NAR offers guidance and “best practices” to prevent being a victim of scams and cybercrime. Even though your agent should be mindful and exercise caution, you should take the initiative to protect yourself. You should be attentive and alert to the possibility of email scams by: not sending sensitive information via email; never trust unverified email; you should not interact with suspicious emails; clean your email regularly; do not conduct business over free WiFi hotspots; and use strong passwords that are changed regularly.

NAR stipulates that the guidance is “not all-inclusive,” and you should check with your agent about their office’s cybersecurity policy. The warning states that the scammer emails are “extremely convincing,” such that “many sophisticated parties have been duped.” No one is “too small” to target, and don’t be over confident about being tech savvy. “This fraud is pervasive, convincing, and constantly evolving.

According to an August 28th report issued by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (Business E-Mail Compromise, An Emerging Global Threat; fbi.gov) BEC (Business E-Mail Compromise) is an insidious scam that is not only targeting real estate, but all businesses and consumers. According to FBI Special Agent Maxwell Marker (of the FBI’s Transnational Organized Crime–Eastern Hemisphere Section in the Criminal Investigative Division), “BEC is a serious threat on a global scale…It’s a prime example of organized crime groups engaging in large-scale, computer-enabled fraud, and the losses are staggering.”

BEC statistics compiled by the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (ic3.gov), from October 2013 to August 2015 reported 8,179 total victims (U.S. and non-U.S.) and $798,897,959.25 combined U.S. and non-U.S. exposed dollar loss. The IC3 has reported that computer intrusions related to BEC are on the rise; and can be initiated via a phishing scam that downloads malware that can access the victim’s data, passwords, and financial information.

Multiple versions of the scam are being implemented, and it’s likely that the tactics will change as cybersecurity catches up with the scammers. The most recent version identified by the IC3 has fraudsters claiming to be a law firm handling confidential information (including real estate transactions). The scammer may use email and/or telephone to contact potential victims, who are pressured to act quickly at the end of the business day.

To learn more about BEC, protection strategies and how file a complaint – visit the Internet Crime Complaint Center (ic3.gov). If you are a victim of BEC, the IC3 recommends that you: contact your financial institution immediately; request that your financial institution contact the corresponding financial institution where the fraudulent transfer was sent; contact your local FBI office (if the wire is recent, the US Department of Treasury Financial Crimes Enforcement Network might be able to help return or freeze the funds); and, regardless of dollar loss, file a complaint with the IC3.

Google+
Copyright © Dan Krell

If you like this post, do not copy; instead please:
reference the article,
like it at facebook
or re-tweet.

Protected by Copyscape Web Plagiarism Detector
Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Posted in consumer, internet, real estate, real estate scams | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

After the blizzard home maintenance

home salesThe warm weather that occurred early in the season probably gave many of us a false sense of security, such that we may have put off the pre-winter inspection. The good news is that it’s not too late; and you should check out your home’s roof, gutters, and the surrounding grounds after the blizzard – even if you’ve already conducted a pre-winter inspection.

The blizzard of 2016 dumped a lot snow, and I’m sure you’ve heard about the collapsed roofs. Even if your roof survived, the stress of the accumulated snow may have caused damage that you won’t see unless you inspect the roofing system (including joists and beams). If your roof is already compromised, the amount of snow or ice it can handle is significantly reduced; and can push it toward failing when you need it the most. Don’t think that your home is immune from such damage; I have experienced home inspections that uncovered a cracked roof truss in an otherwise pristine home.

home maintenance

From the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (disastersafety.org)

According to the Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (disastersafety.org), the average residential roof is designed to hold 20lbs per square foot of snow; beyond that, the roof system becomes “stressed.” Ten to twelve inches of fresh snow is estimated to apply about 5lbs of stress. And given the equation, the Institute says that an average roof in good condition should be able to withstand the stress of up to four feet of fresh snow. “Old” (compacted) snow and ice applies more force than fresh snow, and should be monitored closely in multiple snow events.

Another source of roof and gutter problems during and after a blizzard stem from ice dams. An “ice dam” is formed by the melting and refreezing of snow (or ice). When an ice dam forms on the roof and/or gutters, the expansion of the ice can loosen shingles as well as create gaps in gutters. Damage from ice dams formed during the blizzard has the potential for future damage from heavy spring rains. Loose shingles and gapped gutters can allow water to penetrate the home via ceilings and walls, in addition to allowing roof water runoff directly towards the home’s foundation.

Inspecting your home after a severe weather event can help identify maintenance issues and prevent future headaches; and in some situations, may uncover an urgent safety issue. FEMA’s 2013 Risk Management Series-Snow Load Safety Guide (fema.gov) lists warning signs of an “overstressed” roof to include (but is not limited to): any sagging of ceiling; sagging sprinkler lines or heads; popping, cracking, and creaking noises; sagging roof members; bowing truss members; doors and/or windows that can no longer be opened or closed; cracked or split wood members; cracks in walls; and/or severe roof leaks. If you observe any of these warning signs, FEMA recommends evacuating the home and consulting a structural engineer to inspect and assess the structural integrity of the home.

The amount of snow that a blizzard delivers can saturate the grounds surrounding your home; and if not drained properly, the ground can become supersaturated during spring showers (which can become a flood risk). Once the snow has melted, check the surrounding yard and remove any debris and downed trees that can impede proper drainage (which can also be a hazard during high winds). Make sure downspouts are secure and functional, so as to deposit water away from the home’s foundation.

Google+
Copyright © Dan Krell

If you like this post, do not copy; instead please:
reference the article,
like it at facebook
or re-tweet.

Protected by Copyscape Web Plagiarism Detector
Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Posted in home condition, home maintenance, preparedness, property condition, real estate | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Selling your home is always about the price

From forsalebyowner.com

Pricing a home for a sale is not always easy. There is an abundance of empirical research that has confirmed the many variables that affect sales price. Some influences are manageable and some are not. The top factors to consider when pricing your home to sell include location, condition, features, and timing.

Your home’s physical location is one of the top factors that will affect its sale price. Although home prices vary from neighborhood to neighborhood, your home’s location within the neighborhood could also impact the sale price. Homes located on commuter routes typically sell for less because of the traffic and noise. Even homes located just off of the thoroughfare can be impacted by the perception of traffic and noise; the sale price could be lower than a similar home situated further away from the main road.

A home can sell for more when located close to neighborhood amenities; however, the price could drop if perceived too close. Neil Metz’s research (Effect of Distance to Schooling on Home Prices. The Review of Regional Studies 45.2 (2015):151-171.) indicated that homes located close to schools tend to sell for more. However, the opposite was found with homes within 1,000 feet from schools; the home sale price decreased as the distance from the school closed in from 1,000 feet (probably due to congestion and noise). This effect is typically true for other neighborhood amenities such as shopping areas.

home repairRepairing and upgrading your home prior to listing can increase the sale price. In contrast, deferred maintenance can not only deter home buyers – it could attract low offers; especially if the home has been on the market for a lengthy period. Many home buyers are looking for a “turn-key” home, where they don’t have to be concerned about immediate maintenance; while some are willing to put in the time and effort to personalize a home. If you’re making updates to your home, consider that the quality and installation of upgrades can impacts price as well; cheap fixtures and sloppy workmanship can have a similar affect as deferred maintenance.

Your home’s amenities can also impact the sale price. For example, features such as a finished basement or deck can be appealing and add value. Even green amenities can impact sales price. Research conducted by Cadena and Thomson (An Empirical Assessment of the Value of Green in Residential Real Estate. The Appraisal Journal 83.1 (Winter 2015): 32-40.) concluded that homes that were designated “green” increased sale price by 1%, while certified green homes increased sale price about 2%; however, energy efficient features increased sales price by about 6%!

Finally, your sales price can be affected by the timing of the sale. Miller, Sah, Sklarz, and Pampulov (Is there seasonality in home prices-evidence from CBSAs. Journal of Housing Research, 22(1) (2013), 1-15) conducted a comprehensive study of home sales that occurred in 138 Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs are geographic population centers set by the Office of Management and Budget for use by Federal agencies in collecting, and publishing statistics) from February 2000 to April 2011. They concluded that monthly price changes can vary through the year; and homes that sell during summer months (April through September) typically sell for more than homes that sell during the winter (October through March). However, they point out that the seasonality effect could be due to weather; there is less price variance in areas with less temperature variation.

Google+
Copyright © Dan Krell

If you like this post, do not copy; instead please:
reference the article,
like it at facebook
or re-tweet.

Protected by Copyscape Web Plagiarism Detector
Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Posted in home prices, home pricing strategy, home sale, home seller, Home selling strategy, real estate | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Real estate bargains

real estateThe typical real estate investor and the average home buyer have something in common – they both are looking for a home that makes financial sense, a bargain if you will. After all, who wants to overpay for their home? Although the investor’s priority is purely financial, a home buyer’s priority is a mix of lifestyle requirements that fits a budget. Even with priorities in line, both investors and home buyers don’t always recognize a bargain when it presents itself.

Finding a bargain home is not as easy as some will have you believe. Bargain hunters typically look for distressed properties such as foreclosures (also known as “bank owned” or REO homes) and short sales. Although there was abundant opportunity to buying such homes immediately after the housing crash, many were hesitant due to lack of market confidence. However, as confidence was revived in the housing market, the courthouse real estate auctions were once again attended home buyers and investors looking for good buys. And as home prices increased, so did the price for distressed properties; making it more difficult to find the bargain home. Even “motivated” home owners may not be as motivated as you think in today’s market.

real estate bargains

from Trulia.com

This phenomenon is corroborated by a recent study of “bargain homes” by Trulia’s research blog. Ralph McLaughlin reported on January 7th (Where Is A “Bargain” Really A Bargain?; trulia.com) that advertised bargains were actually good buys in 55 of 100 housing markets. Furthermore, hot markets tend to offer less price discounting than cooler markets; home sellers are less inclined to make price reductions in markets where there is increased buyer competition. Locally, the Baltimore metro region was found to be in the top discounted markets for bargain homes (with an average discount of 11.3%); while the Washington DC metro region was found to be in bottom of discounted markets with an average of 4% discount on a bargain home.

It’s clear now that home prices were at the bottom during 2008-2009. At that time, home inventories swelled and there was an abundance of (what would seem today) “cheap” homes for sale. I wrote at that time (If Cheap isn’t Selling, What is?; May 28, 2008) about how cheap homes were not selling, and how home buyers changed their focus from “buy anything” to buying quality homes that impart value. Of course, one of the main reasons cheap homes were not selling quickly was that there was an additional cost associated with the purchase; most of the cheap homes were distressed and required rehab, or at the very least needed updates and minor renovations.

For most investors, the concept of a bargain home is strictly the result of numbers in a formula; and for some home buyers, the bargain may be about getting a good price. However, a bargain home could be more than just the price tag. Maybe the bargain home is also the “value added” home. Rather than just focusing on price, buyers should also be aware of a home’s potential. Of course there is always risk when buying a home, which we experienced during the financial meltdown eight years ago.

Regardless, many lament having not bought homes at or near the price bottom. But hindsight is 20/20. And what didn’t seem like a bargain just a few years ago, is in comparison to today’s increasing home prices and an active housing market, a missed opportunity.

Google+
Copyright © Dan Krell

If you like this post, do not copy; instead please:
reference the article,
like it at facebook
or re-tweet.

Protected by Copyscape Web Plagiarism Detector
Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Posted in distressed properties, Home Buyer, home buyer behavior, homebuyer, housing market, Market report, market timing, real estate, real estate investing, Real Estate Market | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Home pricing strategies focal point of 2016 housing market

2016 housing market hinges on home prices.

A home selling season has not been anticipated so much by home sellers since 2013. It’s not that 2015 was a bad year for housing, because it wasn’t. It’s that many home owners who have been wanting to sell since 2010 (some because of being underwater) may be in position to make the long awaited move.

Home Prices

CoreLogic HPI (from corelogic.com)

A central reason for the reanimation of the housing market is, of course, home prices. Several major indices concur that home prices have made significant improvements through 2015. S&P/Case-Shiller U.S. National Home Price Index (spindices.com) reported a 5.2% annual increase in October, while the FHFA House Price Index (fhfa.gov) revealed a 6.1% year over year increase in October. November’s CoreLogic HPI (corelogic.com) indicated a 6.2% year over year increase and project a 5.4% year over year home price increase next November. And as much as home values had healthy gains nationwide, the local Washington DC metro region’s home annual price increases were more modest: 3.1% according to CoreLogic, and about 1.7% according to S&P/Case-Shiller.

home equity

US Home Equity Report (from corelogic.com)

Although negative equity continues to burden many home owners, the good news is that the number of underwater homes is decreasing. Although home prices continue to edge higher throughout the nation, there are many who are still underwater. According to CoreLogic’s Equity Report Q3 2015 (corelogic.com), 256,000 homes regained equity. And although 92% of mortgaged homes now have equity, about 4.1 million homes continue to be underwater. 17.6% of mortgaged homes are considered “under-equitied” (less than 20% equity), while 2.2% are “near negative equity” (less than 5% equity). 29.3% of underwater homes in the US are located in five states: Nevada, Florida, Arizona, Rhode Island, and Maryland. While 87.9% of Maryland mortgaged homes have equity, 95.5% of mortgage homes in Washington DC have equity. However, the local Washington DC metro region (DC – VA – MD) records 89.2% of mortgaged homes with equity – leaving about 10.8% of mortgaged homes underwater.

If you’re selling your home this spring, you want to capitalize the market. Although you want to benefit from the current low inventory; realize that by late spring, the housing market gets into full swing and inventory surges while your competition intensifies. Also consider the home buyer: many consider themselves savvy consumers who are money conscious and more fiscally responsible than their 2006 counterparts. Most home buyers want homes that have new or recent updates, including systems (such as HVAC and roof). There are few who are willing to make repairs or upgrade homes they are moving into; much less budget for a new roof or furnace in the first years of home ownership.

Real EstateThe sensible way to make the most of your sale is to have a plan, and pricing your home correctly should be the focal point. Don’t fall into the trap of pricing your home by comparing national price increases or worse yet – media reports of hot markets. Real estate is a local phenomenon and you should collect data within your neighborhood (the closer to your home the better). Your real estate agent should be able to produce a detailed market analysis and explain how the comps vary and correspond with each other and to your home. Consider your home’s condition and amenities. You may have to adjust your price if your home is in need “TLC.” However, updates to the kitchen, bathrooms, windows, roof, flooring, and HVAC not only add appeal but also add value.

Google+
Copyright © Dan Krell

If you like this post, do not copy; instead please:
reference the article,
like it at facebook
or re-tweet.

Protected by Copyscape Web Plagiarism Detector
Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Posted in home equity, Home Price Index, home prices, home pricing strategy, Home selling strategy, housing market, marketing plan, real estate, Real Estate Market, Real Estate Market Trends | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Real estate year in review 2015

home prices

How will Home Prices do in 2016? (from WinningAgent101.com)

2015 could have been considered a “damn if you do and damn if you don’t” year for the Fed. The Fed is often criticized (sometimes harshly) for their action and inaction. And as the historic run of near zero interest rates ended this year, many criticized the Fed for waiting too long to raise interest rates, while others said it was still too soon. The full impact of the first Fed rate hike in nine years won’t be known well into the next year.

Another real estate milestone that occurred this year was the implementation of the TRID (TILA-RESPA Integrated Disclosure) rule. Although the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau decided to delay enactment once; the decision to put the rule in effect in October was not only significant, but a historic change to the real estate settlement process. Initially, there was mixed reception; some lenders indicated that they have transitioned smoothly, while others reported having difficulty. Even Congress attempted to provide a grace period for those still transitioning (Homebuyers Assistance Act, H.R. 3192). Like the Fed’s rate increase, the full effect of TRID on consumers and the industry won’t be realized until next year.

HomeEven though the 2015 housing market started slowly, because of record cold weather; the market demonstrated its resiliency with increased sales and continued home price growth throughout the year. Some markets were on fire this year; such as the Seattle WA region, where multiple offers and single digit days on market were the norm and home price indices exceeded the national average. However, most other regions (such as the Washington DC region) experienced average growth. The lack of inventory in some markets was said to add pressure on price growth. Home sale growth is expected to continue in 2016, as housing formation and employment outlooks are brighter. While home prices are still below the 2006 peak, home prices are expected to increase with a market expansion. And as housing affordability decreases, some housing critics are clamoring to predict another housing bubble.

San Francisco CA was one of 2015’s hottest markets. The market was so heated that many described it as “insane.” Madeline Stone reported that San Francisco teardowns sold for well above $1M while resales typically sold for 70% above list price (San Francisco real estate has gotten so crazy that this startup founder was offered stock options for his house; businessinsider.com; March 31, 2015).

And of course, there is the notable sale of a 765sf two-bedroom home that sold for $408,000 earlier this year (17% over list price). The significance of the 100-year-old San Francisco home is that it was described as a “shack” and needed much more than TLC (Daniel Goldstein; San Francisco earthquake shack sells for $408,000; marketwatch.com; October 22, 2015).

And what can be more proof that the real estate market has been recovering (at least for those who can afford it) than the world’s priciest home sale. Patrick Gower, Francois De Beaupuy , and Devon Pendleton reported on December 15th (This $301 Million Paris Chateau Is the World’s Priciest Home; bloomburg.com) about the sale of Chateau Louis XIV for €257Million (approximately $301Million); a private sale to a Middle Eastern buyer. Located in a 56-acre park, the recently built Paris estate is said to have taken three years to build. Amenities include an aquarium, cinema and a wine cellar, and a gold-leaf fountain.

Google+
Copyright © Dan Krell

If you like this post, do not copy; instead please:
reference the article,
like it at facebook
or re-tweet.

Protected by Copyscape Web Plagiarism Detector
Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Posted in Federal Reserve, home prices, housing, housing market, market, Market report, real estate, Real Estate Market, Real Estate Market Trends, RESPA, TILA | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Fed, interest rates, and the housing market

From Zillow.com

After a historic run of over seven years of near zero interest rates, the Fed pulled the trigger to raise the target rate on December 17th to 0.25% – 0.5%. The last time the Fed changed the rate was almost exactly seven years ago on December 16th 2008, when the rate decreased from 1% to near zero. And it’s the first rate increase since June 29th 2006!

In the midst of what was to become the beginning of the great recession, the Federal Open Market Committee press release  from December 16th 2008 (federalreserve.gov) described the rate change to near zero as a means to, “…promote the resumption of sustainable economic growth and to preserve price stability.  In particular, the Committee anticipates that weak economic conditions are likely to warrant exceptionally low levels of the federal funds rate for some time.” And since, housing experts anticipated a Fed rate increase; often predicting how the real estate market would be affected.

Although a significant move by the Fed, the rate increase is minor and rates continue to be relatively low. And don’t worry, even with last week’s Fed target rate increase last week, it doesn’t mean the that mortgage interest rates automatically increase the same amount. Mortgage rates are gauged by bond yields, which usually anticipate and “bake in” any significant news into rates prior to economic announcements.

Real EstatePutting rates in perspective, Freddie Mac’s Primary Mortgage Market Survey indicated that the average national 30-year-fixed mortgage rate increased last week slightly from 3.95% to 3.97% (and up from the 3.80% a year ago). Furthermore, Freddie Mac’s Economic and Housing Research Weekly Commentary and Economic Update December 17th statement expects a gradual Fed monetary tightening, with a “modest increase” in long term rates. Additionally, “…Mortgage rates will tick higher but remain at historically low levels in 2016. Home sales will remain strong, but refinance activity should cool somewhat…” (freddiemac.com).

Some say that the Fed’s rate increase is premature, while others say that it may be too late to raise rates; however, many economic experts concur that the economy remains in uncharted waters. Regardless, housing experts agree that the Fed rate increase is good for the real estate market.

The National Association of Realtors® chief economist, Lawrence Yun stated that mortgage rates should continue to remain relatively low through 2016, saying, “…The raising of short-term rates could be more of a confidence play to the market — it provides a signal that the economy is strengthening, … and the lenders believe that, it may actually provide more lending opportunity for the banks…” (What the Fed’s Decision Means for Housing; realtormag.realtor.org; December 17, 2015).

Bankrate’s Mark Hamrick pointed out two benefits to the housing market from a rate increase (7 unintended benefits of higher interest rates from the Federal Reserve; bankrate.com; September 11, 2015). The first benefit is increased lending: Banks are incentivized to lend money when rates increase; possibly expanding mortgage lending which could increase the number of qualified home buyers participating in the market. The second benefit is increasing the pool of home buyers: increasing rates could get fence sitters into the market because of rising buyer costs. However, this may be a progressive effect through 2016, as mortgage rates are estimated to gradually increase beyond 4.5% (rising interest rates may also moderate ballooning home prices to prevent another housing bubble).

Google+
Copyright © Dan Krell

If you like this post, do not copy; instead please:
reference the article,
like it at facebook
or re-tweet.

Protected by Copyscape Web Plagiarism Detector
Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Posted in economics, economy, Federal Reserve, housing market, mortgage interest rates, real estate, Real Estate Market | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Selling a home with when you have pets

How to sell a home fast

From FLRealtorMagazine

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association (avma.org), 36.5% of households own a dog and 30.4% of households own a cat, and many households have other types of pets. Of course having a dog or cat can fill many needs, such as companionship, security, socializing, and even fitness. However, selling a home where a pet lives can be tricky.

Pets often leave telltale signs they live in a home. Many people associate strong odors or dander on the floor with a home where a dog or cat lives. However, many pet owners keep clean homes; and odor or dander may not be the giveaway. Home buyers notice many things when wandering a home, and can associate water and food bowls, pet beds, cat litter boxes, and toys with pets. The psychological association could trigger an allergic reaction, even in the cleanest of homes.

home for saleAlthough an increasing number of households include dogs and cats, not all home buyers are keen on pets. And for some it’s a health matter, as many have sensitivities and allergies and such that they ask if a dog or cat lives in the home when scheduling a showing. And it’s not just allergies that can put off a home buyer: pets left inside the home (roaming or crated), pets left in the yard (free roaming or tied up), and pet odors are three of the top four home buyer turn offs, as ranked by Realtor®Mag’s Melissa Dittmann Tracey (Top 10 Worst Home-Showing Offenses; realtormag.realtor.org, October 2012).

Ask someone who is honest with you if your home has an odor; you may be surprised with the answer. It’s common to become used to odors in your home. Don’t make the common mistake of placing heavily scented air fresheners throughout the home, as it only adds another layer of odor; which, by the way, can also trigger a reaction in those with odor sensitivities. Instead, try to identify if the odor has a source and remove it if possible (it may not even be pet related). Consider using natural solutions such as baking soda to absorb light odors; however strong odors may require commercial cleaning.

And about those home buyers who visit your home…don’t assume they are pet friendly. Pet behavior can be misinterpreted. Even if you believe your pets are friendly and well behaved, buyers who are not familiar with dogs or cats can misperceive them as being aggressive and decide to leave. If the buyer does not know how to approach your pet, and they bring small children along, the dynamics can create an agitated pet.

Limit distractions and keep your pets and buyers at ease. Consider putting away your pet’s water bowl, toys, and other signs of your pet. If you have a cat, make sure the litter box is clean. Locking your pet in a room is not recommended by experts, as it can cause distractions and upset your pet. If you have a dog, take them for a walk while the buyer is visiting. At the very least, arrange for someone who is familiar with your pets to be home to manage them.

Selling a home where pets live can be challenging. Although you may think that the best scenario is to sell to another pet owner; nonetheless you should strategize with your agent about your home for sale and managing your pets during the listing.

Google+
Copyright © Dan Krell

If you like this post, do not copy; instead please:
reference the article,
like it at facebook
or re-tweet.

Protected by Copyscape Web Plagiarism Detector
Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Posted in home buyer behavior, home sale, home seller, Home selling strategy, Pets, real estate | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Short sale marketing strategy raise concerns

From Zillow.com

According to the Corelogic Insights blog, the volume of distressed home sales is declining. Consider that during the peak of distressed sales, which occurred in January 2009, the volume of distressed sales nationally comprised 32.4% of total home sales. Compare those figures to Corelogic’s December 2nd report, which indicated that nationwide distressed sales volume accounted for about 10% of all home sales during September 2015. However, distressed sales volume varies from state to state; Maryland recorded the highest volume of distressed sales (20.7%) among all states during September.

distressed home saleDistressed home sales include bank owned properties (REO) and short sales. It’s important to note that prior to the housing bust in 2007, nationwide REO sales were below 6.2% of all sales. September nationwide REO’s accounted for 6.4% of all sales; while short sales accounted for 3.3% of all sales, and have maintained below the 4% level for over a year.

The plateau of short sales may be due the many home owners who remain underwater. In a June 11th press release, Zillow announced that the slow pace of increasing home prices are leaving many home owners underwater. The nationwide rate of negative equity among mortgaged home owners was 15.4% during the first quarter of 2015 (which is down from 18.8% a year ago); the negative equity rate in the D.C. metro area was reported to be 17.2%. For about half of all underwater home owners, home prices would need to increase 20% or more for them to break even (zillow.com/research).

If you are underwater on your mortgage, check with your lender, they may have some options to help you. However, if you are planning a move, a short sale may also be an option. Simply put, a short sale is asking your lender to take a lower payoff and “forgive” the difference.

If you decide to go through the short sale process, you should know that your sale will be subject to your lender’s approval. The lender will decide if they will accept the buyer’s offer based on the home’s “fair market value.” Many lenders use broker price opinions to assist them in determining a sale price; however some lenders may use other avenues.

You should be aware of a recent trend used by some lenders, which is bypassing the short sale process and forcing home sellers to list short sales on auction websites – even if there is an existing contract of sale! The given rationale is that the internet auction process provides a fair market value for the short sale. However, this stance by some lenders may lead some home sellers to breach of contract. In a recent conversation with several local (Maryland) state regulators, the present consensus is that “…they are aware of the situation, but there is nothing they can do about it;” however, they welcome consumer complaints: MD Commissioner of Financial Regualtion and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Even though the concept is straightforward and the government has provided lenders guidance on short sales, the process can still be lengthy and full of surprises. The process does not guarantee a sale, and the lender could still foreclose if you stopped paying the mortgage. Additionally, the short sale may negatively affect your credit; and there may be legal liabilities to consider. So, before you embark on a short sale, you should consult an attorney about all of your options (which may include and is not limited to a loan modification, deed-in-lieu, or bankruptcy).

Google+
Copyright © Dan Krell

If you like this post, do not copy; instead please:
reference the article,
like it at facebook
or re-tweet.

Protected by Copyscape Web Plagiarism Detector
Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Posted in home sale, home seller, Home selling strategy, negative equity, real estate, real estate auction, Short sale | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Feng shui and your home sale

Selling a home with feng shui.

Staging a Home

From greenhomegnome.com

It didn’t seem that long ago when feng shui was important to almost every home buyer and seller. And if Google Trends is an indication of relevance, the diminishing number of searches for feng shui over the last decade indicates reduced interest. Perhaps the bursting housing bubble shifted everyone’s attention; buyers’ were determined to get distressed properties at a deal, while sellers were determined to get a model home look through staging. Although seemingly having lost significance in the housing market, feng shui is once again becoming a top concern for buyers and sellers.

If you’re not familiar with the concept, Merriam Webster (merriam-webster.com) defines feng shui as “…a Chinese system for positioning a building and the objects within a building in a way that is thought to agree with spiritual forces and to bring health and happiness.” The International Feng Shui Guild (ifsguild.org) adds that feng shui is derived from the Chinese philosophy of Taoism and has been practiced for aver 5,000 years. Furthermore, it is based in science and nature to help you live a healthy and prosperous life!

You may already be familiar with some feng shui principles, as a few basics of home staging share similar tasks. For example, de-cluttering, maximizing space and creating a “light filled home” are some of the preparations prescribed to stage a home for sale. And according to feng shui principles, these undertakings are vital in channeling a home’s energy flow. Although there may be some crossover, take caution not to confuse home staging with feng shui; staging a home is not the same as following feng shui principles.

International Home Buyers

From Realtor.org

One of the reasons for the surging focus in feng shui is the increase of home buyers from China. According to the National Association of Realtors® (realtor.org), buyers from China represented about 16% of international home buyers, while purchasing an estimated $28.6 billion of real estate in 2014.

Feng shui is also important to Chinese-Americans, according to a recent survey conducted by Better Homes and Gardens® Real Estate and the Asian Real Estate Association of America (Feng Shui a Driver of Home Selection and Investment for Chinese-Americans; bhgre.com; August 11, 2015). The survey revealed that 76% of respondents are familiar with the principles, and half of those respondents practice feng shui, which is “…considered to dictate spatial arrangement and building design to produce a harmonious flow of energy.” When it comes real estate, consider that 81% of respondents indicated that feng shui influenced their buying decisions; and that 79% of respondents indicated that they would pay more for a home that follows feng shui principles. And if you’re selling a home, you should take notice that 75% of respondents indicated that they experienced at least one “deal breaker” conflict of feng shui principles in a home (infographic on home staging and feng shui).

home saleIf your home doesn’t exactly correspond with feng shui principles, consider offering a “Feng Shui Contingency.” Such a contingency was highlighted in a 2014 Realtor®Mag article about the Seattle housing market and the high concentration of buyers from China (Why You May Need the ‘Feng Shui Contingency; realtormag.realtor.org; September 22, 2014). Much like a home inspection contingency, many buyers are including a contingency to have a feng shui master approve the house. The good news is that some conflicting elements may be remedied (such as landscaping); however, others cannot (such as the home’s physical location and direction).

Google+
Copyright © Dan Krell

If you like this post, do not copy; instead please:
reference the article,
like it at facebook
or re-tweet.

Protected by Copyscape Web Plagiarism Detector
Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Posted in feng shui, home sale, home seller, Home Staging, homebuyer, real estate | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment