Winter home sale prep

winter home prep
Winter home prep (infographic from cdc.gov)

The winter holidays are over, so there shouldn’t be any more disruption to your winter home sale, right?  A winter home sale may not have much competition during the winter months, but the weather could potentially put a stopper on buyer visits.  And in the aftermath of this week’s snow storm, you might have second thoughts about your winter home sale.  But since you’re one of the savvy home sellers, you know that weather is fleeting and winter home buyers are serious. You know to focus on the winter home sale prep.

Selling during the winter is not much different than selling during any other time of year.  In other words, home sale prep is required.  And just as you would during the summer, you should prepare for home buyers to visit your home during a winter home sale.  Instead of the heat and thunderstorms of summer, you should prepare for the cold and snow of winter.  Your home should be warm enough to make visitors comfortable to help them envision living in your home.  Also, consider having a large mat in the entrance where visitors can wipe their shoes or remove them, so as to help keep your home clean.

Decluttering and maintaining a clutter-free home during a home sale is a challenge.  But during the winter, when we tend to retreat inside and “nest,” maintaining a home ready to view can be a test of your will.  Give yourself more time for home sale prep before a home buyer comes knocking.  Consider a daily quick onceover through the house to help maintain order.  Limiting buyer visits to specific times of day can help you feel in control, as well as designate a daily private time when you can relax.

Weather permitting, winter open houses are still appealing for home buyers.  And during the winter when there are few homes listed for sale, there are even fewer open houses making your open house a destination.  Summer or Winter, an open house is an ideal way to have many home buyers visit your home in a concentrated time period.  You should coordinate visiting times and open houses with your agent to eliminate surprises.

Regardless of how well you care for your home, maintenance issues are always a concern during a home sale.  More so during the winter.  If your HVAC system is not working efficiently, it may not be heating your home evenly and consistently.  Aging shingles can cause of ice dams, and allow water penetration into the home.  Blocked gutters and downspouts can cause safety issues by causing standing water and ice on walkways.  Poorly insulated doors and windows cause drafts and cold spots in the home. 

Prepare your home for a winter sale and address maintenance issues before the house goes on the market.  Have your HVAC system serviced and cleaned.  Have a licensed roofer check your roof for missing or damaged shingles.  Consider having a pre-listing home inspection to spot concerns. 

Recent inventory shortages and buyer demand has made winter a great time to sell your home.  However, some home buyers still believe that they can lowball a winter home sale.  And there is a good chance that you will a receive a lowball offer.  You prepare for these buyers by strategizing with your agent on negotiating tactics.  If you receive a lowball offer, don’t get offended.  Instead, take the opportunity to start a dialogue with the buyer.  If the home buyer is serious, they will negotiate in good faith. 

Original located at https://dankrell.com/blog/2019/01/19/winter-home-sale-prep

Copyright© Dan Krell
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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Occam’s razor home selling

Occam's razor and selling a home
Staging is one of the four basics of home selling. (infographic from nar.realtor)

Many home owners are preparing to sell their homes this year.  And in doing so, home sellers are looking for new and exciting ways to sell their homes fast and for top dollar.  But the reality is that selling a home is not rocket science.  There really isn’t a secret trick or approach to selling a home.  Rather, it’s more like magic, where properly performed fundamental tasks can set the stage for a satisfying experience. If you don’t know how Occam’s razor (or what it is) can help you get the most from your home sale, pay close attention.

Unfortunately, it’s a human trait seek a complex solution to a simple question.  In other words, applying Occam’s razer to your home sale can save you time and allow you to get out of your own way.  Occam’s razer is a tool that is often used to figure out solutions and devise scientific theories.  It has become popularized as the “keep it simple stupid” method.  However, Susan Borowski’s history and explanation of Occam’s razor, written for the American Association for the Advancement of Science, gives it teeth (The Origin and Popular Use of Occam’s Razor; aaas.org; June 12, 2012).  Borowski states, “Occam’s razor doesn’t necessarily go with the simplest theory, whether it’s right or wrong; it is not an example of simplicity for simplicity’s sake. It merely tries to cut through the clutter to find the best theory based on the best scientific principles and knowledge at the time.”

In other words, focus on the tried and true fundamentals of selling a home.  Anything above and beyond may not necessarily help to sell the home faster or for more money, but could help make the process more enjoyable.  That in mind, let’s consider these four basic concepts:

First, consider the condition of your home.  Do you have deferred maintenance issues?  Does your home need a makeover?  Homes that get top dollar are “turnkey.”  Many home buyers are willing to compete and pay more for recently upgraded and renovated homes.  Selling a home with deferred maintenance or lacking recent updates can not only turn off many home buyers, but can encourage low-ball offers.  A pre-listing home inspection can help you identify maintenance issues.  Also, consider consulting with a design professional to help you understand which updates (if any) are necessary to help your home sale.

Next, work on the home’s presentation to give it a clean and spacious feel.  Decluttering is one of those tasks that can be overwhelming, but it’s importance cannot be overstated.  Decluttering will force you to decide which items to keep in the home.  Additionally, staging your home can help balance space, furniture and décor.  This can help home buyers envision living in the home.

Deciding on a list price is often a conundrum.  Although enticing, don’t be seduced by the agent who tells you the highest sales price without understanding their rationale.  The housing market can turn on a dime.  If your home isn’t priced correctly, it can languish on the market.  There are many aspects that go into deciding a price, so work with a respected seasoned agent to go through the market details and scenarios. 

Finally, when the home is ready to list, how is it to be marketed?  Today’s MLS listing syndication takes advantage of the fact that most home buyers actively search homes on the internet. Don’t rely on gimmicks that promise activity on your listing.  A complete marketing plan will take into account the factors we discussed here, and apply strategies to attract motivated home buyers.

Original located at https://dankrell.com/blog/occam’s-razor-home-selling

Copyright© Dan Krell
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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

New homes allure is neurological

new homes
New homes (infographic from candysdirt.com)

Last week I mentioned that new home sales jumped 18.7 percent year-over-year, which is a ten-year high.  It should come as no surprise that new homes are selling like hotcakes.  After all, existing home inventory has been and remains historically low, which doesn’t give many options to home buyers.  But there are other reasons for the allure of new construction.  Some of the home buyers’ motives are apparent and some are not so obvious.

The idea of buying new construction goes beyond the “new home feel.”  Buyers of new homes are attracted to modern designs and trends that are incorporated into new houses.  New home construction takes advantage of modern building techniques and materials that allow for the open floor-plan concept that many home buyers prefer.  Many of the materials used in new construction are “engineered” for efficiency and longevity.

Buyers of new homes like the feeling that there will be minimal maintenance for the first year.  Everything is brand new and there is sense of confidence that the home’s systems won’t need major repairs or replacement.  Being the first owner of a home also gives assurance that they won’t have to deal with the poor maintenance habits of the previous owner.  This is a plus for home buyers who don’t have a lot of financial reserves to address home maintenance emergencies.  Instead, they can begin to save and budget for future repairs and replacements that should be years down the road.

New home builders take advantage of current trends in green building practices.  Many new home builders tout their LEED certification, demonstrating their commitment to energy efficiency and sustainable resources.  Green building practices are not only used when the home is built, but is actually built into the design.  Home owners seeking LEED certified builders believe they will have a smaller impact on the environment and save money on energy costs.

A new trend that buyers are pursuing is the “healthy home.”  The healthy home concept emphasizes the quality of the air inside the home.  Home buyers are becoming aware of the physical and environmental benefits of good indoor air quality, which can improve their emotional well-being and reduce the potential for respiratory distress.

But there is another reason why home buyers are attracted to new homes, and it lies within the brain.  Research has demonstrated time and again that consumers respond to novelty.  This means that home buyers have a tendency to want “new.”  This can be interpreted into making an old home new by renovating a kitchen, bathroom, etc.  Or it can mean buying a newly built home.

new homes
the desire for new homes may start with the limbic system (infographic from success-mohawk.com)

The novelty seeking behavior of the home buyer isn’t just a choice, as some may argue, it’s neurological.  Basically, the desire for a new home lies within the brain.  A study conducted by Nico Bunzeck and Emrah Düzel (Absolute Coding of Stimulus Novelty in the Human Substantia Nigra/VTA; 2006; Neuron 51, 369-379) demonstrated that the hippocampal region of the brain responds to novel (new) stimuli.  The hippocampal region is part of the limbic system, which is noted for being responsible for memory and emotions.  It has also been associated with motivation.

The study also discusses the idea that novelty seeking behavior isn’t just emotional, but it is also rewarding.  This means that there is a behavioral loop for seeking new things, including buying a new home.

Home sellers need to take note of these findings.  Translating this study to home buyers may mean that a home’s feeling of “newness” is important, regardless if it’s construction, renovation, or even how the home is decorated.  Understanding what attracts and motivates home buyers can be the tipping point to get a home sold.

Original published at https://dankrell.com/blog/2017/12/08/new-homes-allure-neurological/

Copyright© Dan Krell
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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Sign ban or boosting Realtors?

Sign ban or free speech
Sign ban or Free speech? (infographic from newseum.org)

A special thanks to the Montgomery County Council whose proposed sign ban will undoubtedly help local real estate agents.  Last week’s testimony about a zoning text amendment relating to signs and their location illuminated their place in the community as well as reminded us they are a form of free speech.

Of course the unintended consequences of a blanket sign ban in the right of way is yet to be determined.  However, it would certainly make it more difficult for county residents to sell their home by owner (without an agent), as well as home buyers wanting to go it alone without an agent.  The resulting lack of information that is currently provided by these signs would certainly compel consumers to hire a local Realtor®. Thank you.

Greater Capital Area Association of Realtors® (GCAAR) president Peg Mancuso testified: “From a real estate perspective, signs are an inevitable means of communicating with Montgomery County residents both new and existing. The proposed sign ban would be a tremendous inconvenience to community members who are in need of information for short term related events, such as open houses.”  She mentioned a Realtor® best practice (which most agents adhere to) of placement of open house signs just prior to and removal immediately after the event.  She also pointed out that many home owners are unaware how their properties relate to the right of way, as well as being uneducated about the permitting process of signs.  These logistical and educational issues would make such a sign ban difficult for home owners to advertise their homes.

GCAAR vice president and COO Bill Highsmith, Jr reminded those at the hearing that GCAAR not only represents local real estate professionals, but is also a voice for home owners on property rights issues.  He asserted that signs in the right of way have historically been a means of business advertisement, expression, and community engagement.  He stated that “…publically visible signs are an important method of communication for county residents, Realtors® and the broader real estate market.”

Mr. Highsmith stated, “For Realtors® and the clients they serve, these signs are a particularly important way to communicate information about open houses and homes that are for sale.  While you may believe the internet is the primary way folks learn about opportunities to purchase a home, real estate signs are vital to let the broader public know about the real estate market in surrounding neighborhoods.”  He cited anecdotal evidence that many home buyers have bought the home they initially spotted from a sign.  He asserted that many consumers begin the home buying process by visiting open houses (especially first time home buyers).  And additionally suggested that these signs allow more county residents to become home buyers.

Allen Myers of the Maplewood Citizen Association (MCA) stated that these signs are useful to inform their residents of association meetings.  Collection of permitting fees for temporary signs would be cost prohibitive, possibly adding additional financial burden to the members of the association.  He asserted that the MCA believes that the signs are Constitutionally protected form of free speech.

It is reasonable to believe that many people agree seeing “shoe repair” signs are annoying.  And it is also reasonable to surmise that improperly planted signs can become a hazard.  Nonetheless, the takeaway for anyone attending last week’s hearing should be that these signs are beneficial to the community.

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Home pricing strategies focal point of 2016 housing market

2016 housing market hinges on home prices.

A home selling season has not been anticipated so much by home sellers since 2013. It’s not that 2015 was a bad year for housing, because it wasn’t. It’s that many home owners who have been wanting to sell since 2010 (some because of being underwater) may be in position to make the long awaited move.

Home Prices
CoreLogic HPI (from corelogic.com)

A central reason for the reanimation of the housing market is, of course, home prices. Several major indices concur that home prices have made significant improvements through 2015. S&P/Case-Shiller U.S. National Home Price Index (spindices.com) reported a 5.2% annual increase in October, while the FHFA House Price Index (fhfa.gov) revealed a 6.1% year over year increase in October. November’s CoreLogic HPI (corelogic.com) indicated a 6.2% year over year increase and project a 5.4% year over year home price increase next November. And as much as home values had healthy gains nationwide, the local Washington DC metro region’s home annual price increases were more modest: 3.1% according to CoreLogic, and about 1.7% according to S&P/Case-Shiller.

home equity
US Home Equity Report (from corelogic.com)

Although negative equity continues to burden many home owners, the good news is that the number of underwater homes is decreasing. Although home prices continue to edge higher throughout the nation, there are many who are still underwater. According to CoreLogic’s Equity Report Q3 2015 (corelogic.com), 256,000 homes regained equity. And although 92% of mortgaged homes now have equity, about 4.1 million homes continue to be underwater. 17.6% of mortgaged homes are considered “under-equitied” (less than 20% equity), while 2.2% are “near negative equity” (less than 5% equity). 29.3% of underwater homes in the US are located in five states: Nevada, Florida, Arizona, Rhode Island, and Maryland. While 87.9% of Maryland mortgaged homes have equity, 95.5% of mortgage homes in Washington DC have equity. However, the local Washington DC metro region (DC – VA – MD) records 89.2% of mortgaged homes with equity – leaving about 10.8% of mortgaged homes underwater.

If you’re selling your home this spring, you want to capitalize the market. Although you want to benefit from the current low inventory; realize that by late spring, the housing market gets into full swing and inventory surges while your competition intensifies. Also consider the home buyer: many consider themselves savvy consumers who are money conscious and more fiscally responsible than their 2006 counterparts. Most home buyers want homes that have new or recent updates, including systems (such as HVAC and roof). There are few who are willing to make repairs or upgrade homes they are moving into; much less budget for a new roof or furnace in the first years of home ownership.

Real EstateThe sensible way to make the most of your sale is to have a plan, and pricing your home correctly should be the focal point. Don’t fall into the trap of pricing your home by comparing national price increases or worse yet – media reports of hot markets. Real estate is a local phenomenon and you should collect data within your neighborhood (the closer to your home the better). Your real estate agent should be able to produce a detailed market analysis and explain how the comps vary and correspond with each other and to your home. Consider your home’s condition and amenities. You may have to adjust your price if your home is in need “TLC.” However, updates to the kitchen, bathrooms, windows, roof, flooring, and HVAC not only add appeal but also add value.

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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.