Finding a real estate bargain

Many first-time home buyers and investors whom I encounter typically ask about foreclosures and handyman-specials. Essentially they are looking to buy a real estate bargain. When is the best time to by a real estate bargain?

A foreclosure is a home that has been repossessed by the holder of the mortgage note, usually a bank. The process of foreclosure varies depending in which state the foreclosed home exists and what type of mortgage document exists on the home. To make a long story short, the home is either auctioned to the highest bidder, or the home is taken over by the bank to be sold on the market. The foreclosed homes that are put on the market are also called REO, which stands for real estate owned by bank.

Foreclosed homes can also be bought at auction. Auctions are usually conducted at the courthouse by a local auctioneer. These types of auctions are also known as a trustee’s sale or substitute trustee’s sale. If you are interested in attending an auction, you can find the advertisements for the auctions in the local papers’ classified section. To bid on the home, you must have the minimum deposit in the form of certified funds. The minimum deposit is usually posted in the advertisement. If you are buying a foreclosed home at auction, you are essentially buying it “as-is” without the ability to do a home inspection prior to close.

When the bank has taken title to a foreclosed home, a Realtor is usually hired to list the home on the Multiple List Service (MLS). In this scenario, you have an opportunity to view the home before you decide to submit your offer. The home is generally sold “as-is.” Hopefully, you will have a Realtor of your own to advise you of the value and general condition of the home.

Generally, the process of buying a foreclosed property can be bumpy due to foreclosure process. Sometimes the previous owner will damage the home (sometimes on purpose), or take valuable materials out of the home such as copper or other fixtures. Additionally, the home is locked up for months, often without utilities. Mold growth is typical due to water penetration, and/or other structural and environmental concerns.

A handyman special is a term that is often used when a home is sold by the owner. The home can have deferred maintenance or other damage.  The home could be a rental property in need of “TLC.” Many times, a handyman special will require mostly a great deal of cosmetic work, such as painting, carpet, etc. Sometimes, there are some structural concerns, such as (but not limited to) replacing a roof, or fixing walls.

Overall, when considering a real estate bargain whether you will have to determine if the home is worth the price you want to pay. In addition to the acquisition cost, you will have to consider the total cost to repair the home, as well as the costs to make updates. It is also important to look at the recent neighborhood comparables to see if the price or adjusted price (price plus costs for repairs) is in line.

If the market is depressed or a buyers’ market, there may be some choices in a real estate bargain.  However,  if the market favors the seller, there are fewer bargains. In a sellers’ market, distressed properties can sell for close to market value.

by Dan Krell © 2005

What happens to your home in a divorce?

What happens to a family home in a divorce?

When divorce is imminent, people tend to worry about the children’s future, how to treat the mother-in-law who was so nice (lucky fellow), how their friends will react. Of course, these should be at the top of one’s mind. There are many concerns to worry about.

Beyond family concerns, finances and real estate are important also. Figuring out who gets what and how much can get messy, antagonistic and litigious. That is why an attorney should be consulted on these matters.

But what about the marital home? There are various options and outcomes. Sometimes the agreement is amicable.  However, there are many times where spouses disagree and rely on their legal counsel.  Sometimes, the court steps in and appoints a trustee to determine the disposition of the home.

It’s common for one party to offer to buy out the other’s interest in the home.  But in doing so, coming up with the money may be a challenge.  “Cash-out” refinance and home equity lines are sometimes a solution if the spouse meets the lender’s underwriting guidelines.   Of course, if the home has no equity, then relying on a cash-out refi may not work.

Selling a home is emotional and stressful. Selling a home during a divorce can compound the stress.  It’s important to be as objective and fair as possible when making decisions about the marital home.   If you are selling your home, hire a professional Realtor who is objective and adept in handling such sales.  Consult with an attorney on matters of separation and divorce.

by Dan Krell © 2005
Copyright Dan Krell 2005.

What happened to afordable housing?

Everyone in the Metro area knows that housing costs have risen at what seems to be an exponential rate in the last few years. If you are a first time home buyer, the shock of Metro area home prices must be like watching the Texas Chain Saw Massacre. But what about affordable housing?

What happened to affordable housing? According to the Greater Capital Association of Realtors (www.gcaar.com), the average sales price for a single family home in Montgomery County in January 2005 was $512,743. Comparatively, the price of a single family home in January 2004 was $435,898. Evidence that it is becoming increasingly harder for a first time home buyer to own a single family home.

Although the price of a home may not seem affordable, there are some ways to make it affordable. Montgomery County has always had some form of assistance to boost home ownership. Some of the programs that have been prevalent for some time now include the moderately priced dwelling unit program (MPDU), special loan programs and closing cost assistance.

The moderately priced dwelling unit program was established in 1974 by Montgomery County to provide affordable housing. The program allows a homebuyer to purchase a home at a special price. The homebuyer must qualify for financing and meet other criteria. There are MPDU’s scattered throughout the county in many communities and exist in many forms, such as townhomes, condos and semidetached homes.

There are restrictions on purchasing a MPDU, as one can imagine. The restrictions include a certificate of use, resale restrictions, and shared profits. The certificate of use requires the owner to live in the property, and not be able to rent to tenants. Additionally, when you are ready to sell your home, the price is restricted. Any profits that incur from the sale must be split with the Housing Initiative Fund (HIF) (which spends the money for additional affordable housing). The current price for a townhome is very affordable (check the website below). Information on qualifying and other regulations for the MPDU program, please visit the Montgomery County Department of Housing and Community Affairs website www.montgomerycountymd.gov/apps/dhca/index.asp.

If you choose not to go through the MPDU program, or if you do not qualify, there are other programs available to help with your purchase. Community programs, such as the Housing Opportunities Commission, offer special financing and closing cost help. If you visit their website, www.hocmc.org, you can see that there are currently two loan programs that offer below rate assistance for qualifying purchasers. One loan program offers a starting interest rate of 3.55%. These loan programs will qualify you to purchase a home that you might not otherwise qualify.

If financing is not a problem, you might need some closing cost help. The Housing Opportunities Commission has a couple of options for this too. One program offers a loan for up to five percent of the purchase price of the home. If you are short on cash, help such as this is a Godsend.

Although the average price of a home may not seem affordable to many first time home buyers, there are programs that are available to help with the purchase. Each program mentioned here does have qualifying criteria, as well as restrictions, and should be checked before embarking on your endeavor. Both agencies mentioned here are very knowledgeable and want to help you with any questions you may have.

by Dan Krell
Copyright Dan Krell 2005