Buyer’s market home selling

Buyer's Market
Home Selling Mistakes (infographic from floridarealtors.org)

As winter approaches, many home sellers will be contemplating their next move after their homes have not sold.  It is likely that a volatile housing market awaits home sellers during the first half of 2018.  If you’re planning to list your home, you should have a selling plan that is able to adjust to market conditions quickly.  In other words, know about home selling in a buyer’s market.

The good news for home sellers is that this year’s home sale prices continue to climb, as the September 26th 20-city composite of the S&P Corelogic Case Shiller National Home Price Index (spindices.com) revealed.  The national index during July increased 5.8 percent compared to the same period last year, while the Washington DC area realized a 3.3 percent year over year gain.  However, there is expectation home sale prices may moderate or even slightly decrease in the first quarter of 2018 because of Fed policy and other market forces.

David M. Blitzer, Managing Director and Chairman of the Index Committee at S&P Dow Jones Indices stated in the release:

“While home prices continue to rise, other housing indicators may be leveling off. Sales of both new and existing homes have slipped since last March. The Builders Sentiment Index published by the National Association of Home Builders also leveled off after March. Automobiles are the second largest consumer purchase most people make after houses. Auto sales peaked last November and have been flat to slightly lower since. The housing market will face two contradicting challenges during the rest of 2017 and into 2018. First, rebuilding following hurricanes across Texas, Florida and other parts of the south will lead to further supply pressures. Second, the Fed’s recent move to shrink its balance sheet could push mortgage rates upward.”

Of course, home sale price indices only show sale prices for homes that sell.  And while home sale prices are increasing back to record levels in many areas, the volume of homes sold during 2017 so far is disappointing.  According to a September 20th NAR news release (realtor.nar), August’s existing home sales dropped 1.7 percent.  The Pending Home Sale Index for August dropped 2.6 percent, which made the NAR revise their 2017 home sale forecast to be “slightly below the pace set in 2016.”  Home sale volume in the first quarter of 2018 may also lag due to continued lack of inventory and anticipated increasing mortgage interest rates.  Lawrence Yun, cheif NAR economist, quipped

“The supply and affordability headwinds would have likely held sales growth just a tad above last year, but coupled with the temporary effects from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, sales in 2017 now appear will fall slightly below last year…The good news is that nearly all of the missed closings for the remainder of the year will likely show up in 2018, with existing sales forecast to rise 6.9 percent.”

Since these are August sales figures from the NAR, it is an unfortunate truth that August sales were not really affected by hurricanes. Mostly because hurricane Harvey hit Texas the very last days of August and Irma hit Florida in September. The main affects of the hurricanes disruption to existing home sales will be seen in September’s statistics. And “missed closings” is a euphemism for phantom closings, because they don’t really exist. So, with regard to sliding home sales, you should take Yun’s “headwinds” of supply and affordability very seriously.

Home selling in 2018, a buyer’s market?

Home sellers positioning themselves solely on this year’s home sale prices may be in for a rude awakening next year.  Sellers may feel as if the market is getting soft, however that may change the latter half of 2018 as home prices moderate.  Sellers will need to be reasonable.  They will need to have awareness of many factors besides home sale prices, including existing home sales volume and neighborhood sale trends.  Including home selling in a buyer’s market.

If you’re planning to sell your home, you will need to play to your audience (home buyers), and listen to their feedback.  Know how to sell in 2018.  Prepare your home before listing it in the MLS by repairing deferred maintenance and possibly making updates.  Home buyers have a track record of paying more for a home that has been totally renovated.  However, if you don’t completely repair and/or update your home, be prepared to lower your sale price.

Be flexible to quickly adjust to the market.  Feedback is highly important to get other’s perspectives about your home.  However, take Realtor feedback with a grain of salt.  Instead, have your agent collect buyer feedback at open houses. Home buyers tend to be more honest when giving feedback, and it can be especially helpful in a buyer’s market.  If the consensus is that the price is too high, the price may actually be too high.  If buyers are turned off by the condition and/or curb appeal of the home, consider making repairs or lowering price to reflect the condition.  If they are focused on your décor, consider hiring a professional stager to make the home more appealing.

Rather than a soft market, we are experiencing the struggle for a balanced market due to an inventory shortage and sharply decreasing affordability.  The last year and a half has been all about the home seller.  However, 2018 will be about the home buyer.  Home selling in a volatile or buyer’s market can be challenging. If you’re planning a sale, be realistic about your home’s condition and value. Over pricing your home from the start can make your home languish on the market, which could get you a much lower price if it sells.

Copyright© Dan Krell
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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Attract home buyers – Zillow listing

attract home buyers
Attract home buyers (infographic from blogs.realtor.org)

If you’re selling your home, check your Zillow listing.  You may find that the information may not be complete.  Or worse, the information posted is from a previous sale.  But don’t worry, Zillow now gives you the tools to take control, attract home buyers, and improve your sale.

Most of the information you see on your Zillow listing is syndicated from the MLS.  This means that your listing agent uploads information to the MLS and the MLS sends it to other websites.  If you’re not happy with the listing, your agent can change some information via the MLS, and/or log into the Zillow listing to make changes.  However, if your listing agent is too busy to service your listing or does not know about logging into your Zillow listing, you can now take control and attract home buyers.

Zillow offers home owners the opportunity to “claim” their home to access features to personalize information to help home buyers (and Zillow) to get a better picture about their home.  The “Personalized Owner Dashboard” gives you control of your listing (zillowgroup.com/news/personalized-owner-dashboard).

Of the many available tools, online metrics is useful to see how much attention your home is getting from home buyers.  You can view your home listing’s online activity, including how many times the listing has been viewed compared to your competition.

Improve on the house description by adding “What I love about the home.”  This feature conveys to home buyers what attracted you to your home.  Elicit the home buyer’s emotions to visit it and attract home buyers by adding your story.

The MLS limits the number of pictures on your listing.  So, solely relying on the MLS feed can also limit your Zillow listing.  Increasing the number of pictures and adding video can make your home listing more robust, and attention getting.  Zillow allows you (and your agent) to upload additional pictures.  You can upload, arrange, and describe additional photos to help give home buyers the best view of your home.  Zillow even lets you upload a video that you record from your smartphone!  Besides including a link to the MLS virtual tour, Zillow added the “walk through” video feature last year.

Not happy with your Zestimate?  You’re not alone.  Zillow’s Zestimate tool has received mixed reviews since its inception.  Many home buyers and sellers have used the tool as a guide in to help their buying and selling by looking at house and neighborhood trends.  However, there has been criticism from home owners and real estate agents saying that home valuation tool is not inaccurate and does not correctly portray their homes and listings.  As a response, Zillow has changed the algorithm over the years.  And this year, Zillow announced a $1,000,000 prize for the best model to improve the Zestimate tool (zillow.com/promo/zillow-prize).  But that hasn’t stopped a class action suit that complains that the Zestimate is “misleading” home buyers (Rachel Koning Beals; Do Zillow ‘Zestimates’ mislead home buyers? Lawsuit claims yes; marketwatch.com; May 23, 2017).

Improve your Zestimate.  Yes, you can improve your Zestimate.  The dashboard allows you to update the facts about your home.  Updating your home’s information will give home buyers a better description, and it can possibly improve the Zestimate.  Since the Zestimate is based on public records, all your home’s information may not be current or complete.  Telling Zillow about the extras, such as bathrooms, a finished basement, a deck, etc. can be a plus and attract home buyers.

Copyright© Dan Krell
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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Selling your home – try, try, again

selling your home
Why your home didn’t sell (infographic from househuntnetwork.com

If your home didn’t sell this spring, it’s ok.  Rocky never quit when he lost, and neither should you.  No one said selling your home was easy.  Take stock and plan for your next sale.

If your home didn’t sell, you’re not alone.  Consider that April’s existing home sales dropped 2.3 percent, according to the National Association of Realtors May 24th press release (nar.realtor).  NAR Chief Economist, Lawrence Yun, stated that the April slide was “expected” because March sales were very strong.  Additionally, he pointed out that new and existing inventory is not meeting demand.  Many prospective home buyers are frustrated because there is not much of a choice and they are not finding the homes they want.  When selling your home, does it have features that buyers want?

Pending home sales also declined in April.  Based on contracts signed, the forward looking indicator suggests additional decreased sales in the months to come.  Yun also attributes the prospect of future decreased home sales to low housing inventory. He stated that the inventory of existing homes for sale decreased about 9 percent from the same time last year.

When selling your home, consider that the appearance of a brief period of slow sales is not necessarily a warning sign of an impending housing crisis.  Instead, a slower sales trend may be considered part of a normal economic cycle after a breakthrough sales year.  It is a sign of a healthy market seeking balance.  The cycle is caused by home buyers and sellers struggling to find equilibrium.

If your home didn’t sell, you may have a better chance in a few months when the cycle changes.  However, before going with the same strategy, try to analyze what happened during this listing period.  You may find interesting and revealing information, about your home and your agent, that could help you the next time.

First, talk to your listing agent.  If they were active in marketing your home, they should have a wealth of information.  Start by asking them about showings.  The number of showings determines buyer interest in your home.  If you had few visits to your home, it could mean the price is too high.  It could also be a result of low quality MLS pictures and information.  Buyers start with the MLS listing to determine if the home is worth a visit.  However, if you had plenty of buyer visits but no offers, there may be other issues that need attention.

Check with your agent for feedback.  Agents often communicate about their visits to homes.  Home buyers who attend open houses also provide feedback.  Skip over the positive feedback because agents and home buyers often offer positive feedback just to be polite, even if it’s not warranted.  Look toward critical reviews for help to improve your home presentation and marketing.  If the same item is mentioned multiple times, you should take that as an indicator and begin there.

When selling your home, price, presentation and marketing are relatively easy to adjust.  However, your home’s condition could be a deterrent.  Buyers in the current market are very demanding and selective.  They want a turn-key home that has the recent updates featuring the newest technologies.  Even though housing inventory is low, many home buyers will not settle for any house.  If your home is not updated relative to the top sales in your neighborhood, you may have to consider a major price adjustment.  If your home’s condition is holding back a sale, do a cost-benefit analysis.  You may discover that selling for less could net you more than if you spent tens-of-thousands on renovations.

Copyright© Dan Krell
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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Consumers changing real estate agent commissions

real estate agent commissions
Real estate agent commissions (infographic from visual.ly)

Consumers have most likely complained about real estate agent commissions since the advent of real estate brokerage.  However, before the turn of this century, most did not question the real estate agent commissions they paid because they chalked it up to the cost of selling a home.  Times have changed, such that having a conversation about commissions and compensation is a common topic when agents and consumers first meet.

Real estate agent compensation is evolving as fast as the industry.  The US Bureau of Labor Statistics (bls.gov) reports the median annual wage for real estate sales agents was $44,090 in May 2016 (The lowest 10 percent earned less than $22,230, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $112,570). The BLS states:

“An agent’s income, therefore, often depends on economic conditions, the agent’s individual motivation, and the types of property available. Income usually increases as agents become better and more experienced at sales. Earnings can be irregular, especially for beginners, and agents sometimes go weeks or months without a sale. “

Before the turn of this century, there was more conformity in real estate agent commissions because most agents were not negotiable in the compensation they charged.  However, modern agents have adjusted their business models and are open to negotiate how much they will be paid.

There are also many real estate broker compensation structures from which you can choose.  Some brokers offer limited services, and some offer fee-for services, which includes a MLS placement service.  Some fee for service brokers offer à la carte services, where you can choose specific services for which you want to pay.  Most “full service” agents still charge a percentage, but the percentage can vary from agent to agent.  Full service agents can also vary on the extent of the “full” service they provide; however, many will be open to negotiate their commission rate.  Regardless of model, get the agent’s services in writing and hold your agent accountable.

The increased market pressure on agent compensation is actually good for the consumer.  It doesn’t only lower the cost of the real estate transaction, but it also increases the quality of services.  This was the finding of an empirical study by Panle Jia Barwick and Parag A. Pathak (The costs of free entry: an empirical study of real estate agents in Greater Boston; The RAND Journal of Economics; Vol 46, No. 1, Spring 2015, p.103–145).  Their study investigated three scenarios that are chipping away at the traditional real estate agent compensation models: lower commissions, commissions based on break-even costs, and improved information about agents’ past performance.

Barwick and Pathak found some interesting outcomes from their research.  Besides concluding that there are consequences for fixed real estate agent commissions, they also discovered that the easy entry into the industry (i.e., the ease of getting a real estate license) reduces the quality of service.  Furthermore, the increased competition among real estate agents caused by easy entry into the industry is not beneficial to a home selling or time on market.  They also concluded that

“…lower commissions reduce transaction costs, which might lead to a more liquid housing market, improved asset allocation, and better housing consumption. Flexible commissions also provide a channel for consumers to choose services tailored to their preferences.”

Their results suggest

“…that a 50% cut in commissions would result in 40% fewer agents, social savings that amount to 23% of industry revenue, and 73% more transactions for the average agent.”

Realtors should embrace the discussion about compensation and real estate agent commissions with their clients.  It offers the agent an opportunity to demonstrate their accountability.  It also promotes transparency and the services we Realtors provide, and builds the trust that is lacking in the industry.

Copyright© Dan Krell
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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.

Real estate auction home buying and selling

real estate auction
Real estate auction (infographic from warwickauctions.co.uk via visual.ly)

As the housing market continues to grow, buying and selling homes through the real estate auction is becoming more popular.  Contrary to popular belief, real estate auctions are not just for distressed properties.  Being part of a real estate auction can be exciting, but it’s not for everyone.  There are pros and cons for both the home buyer and seller.

A real estate auction is traditionally a “live” auction performed at a designated place where the bidders and auctioneer meet to conduct the auction.  You must be present, or have a proxy present, to make your bid.  You must register to bid at the auction, usually presenting proof of funds for your deposit.  The pace of the live auction can be very quick, so you have to pay close attention to the action.

Another form of real estate auction that has blossomed out of the foreclosure crisis, is the online auction.  The online real estate auction allows many homes to be auctioned simultaneously.  The atmosphere and pace of an online auction is different from a live auction.  Of course, buyers can make their bid from virtually anywhere, and the bidding can take place over days or weeks.

If you want to sell your home via real estate auction, the benefits include: decreasing your homes time on market; you know when the home will sell; the home sells “as-is;” home buyer contingencies are typically few or none.  The National Association of Realtors (nar.realtor) auction information describes homes that are good prospects (What Properties are Suited for Auction?) , which include: homes with a lot of equity; unique homes; vacant homes; and homes that are difficult to appraise.

However, real estate auctions are not for all sellers.  The downside to the auction is that your home may not sell, especially if you place a reserve (seller reserves the right to accept or reject highest bid) on the auction.  There are also costs that typically include the auctioneer’s commission and advertising costs, which could be due even if the home does not sell.

If you’re a home buyer, a real estate auction offers benefits for you too.  Real estate auctions offer another avenue to purchase homes other than those listed in the MLS.  This can be attractive especially when there is limited inventory of homes for sale.  Buyers guide the sale price through their bidding.  Unless it’s a blind bid auction (where bids are not disclosed to other bidders), you can decide if you want to increase your bid based on others’ bids.

If you want to buy a home at auction, do your due diligence.  Read the terms of sale, there may be a minimum bid, minimum deposit, and even a buyer’s premium (which can be as high as 5 percent of sale price) and other fees that may be due at closing.  Check the auction schedule frequently because the date and time may change, or the auction can be cancelled.  Understand the type of auction you’re bidding in, because you may not get the home even if you’re the highest bidder (especially online auctions).  Inspecting the property may be a challenge as you may have limited access.

Hire a Realtor to help you buy a home at a real estate auction

Hire a Realtor to assist and guide you through the details of buying a home via real estate auction.  Your agent can help you get the terms of sale and any due diligence material the auctioneer provides.  Additionally, they can also provide comps for the property to help you decide on your bidding strategy.  If you have the winning bid, your agent can help you with the details of getting you to settlement by assisting with contracts, financing, and other aspects of the sale.

From the National Association of Realtors auction section:

BENEFITS TO THE SELLER:
-Buyers come prepared to buy
-Quick disposal reduces long-term carrying costs, including taxes & maintenance
-Assurance that property will be sold at true market value
-Exposes the property to a large number of pre-qualified prospects
-Accelerates the sale
-Creates competition among buyers—auction price can exceed the price of a negotiated sale
-Requires potential buyers to pre-qualify for financing
-The seller knows exactly when the property will sell
-Eliminates numerous and unscheduled showings
-Takes the seller out of the negotiation process
-Ensures an aggressive marketing program that increases interest and visibility

BENEFITS TO THE BUYER:

Smart investments are made as properties are usually purchased at fair market value through competitive bidding
-The buyer knows the seller is committed to sell
-In multi-property auctions the buyer sees many offerings in the same place at the same time
-Buyers determine the purchase price
-Auctions eliminate long negotiation periods
-Auctions reduce time to purchase property
-Purchasing and closing dates are known
-Buyers know they are competing fairly and on the same terms as all other buyers
-Buyers receive comprehensive information on property via due diligence packet

Copyright© Dan Krell
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Disclaimer. This article is not intended to provide nor should it be relied upon for legal and financial advice. Readers should not rely solely on the information contained herein, as it does not purport to be comprehensive or render specific advice. Readers should consult with an attorney regarding local real estate laws and customs as they vary by state and jurisdiction. Using this article without permission is a violation of copyright laws.